Ticket prices drop for first World Series game at Truist Park

Braves fans gather at The Battery Atlanta on Tuesday to watch the first game of the World Series between the Braves and the Astros in Houston. (Photo: Branden Camp for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

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Braves fans gather at The Battery Atlanta on Tuesday to watch the first game of the World Series between the Braves and the Astros in Houston. (Photo: Branden Camp for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Ticket prices on the secondary market for Friday’s World Series game at Truist Park dropped in the hours leading to the first pitch (scheduled for 8:09 p.m.) as some sellers became increasingly motivated to move their tickets.

Prices remained high by historical standards, starting on StubHub at $650 ($800 with fees) for standing-room-only as of late Friday afternoon, but were down sharply from a starting price point of $1,030 the day before.

Meanwhile, for a seat at Saturday night’s game at Truist Park, the lowest price listed on StubHub — the official fan-to-fan ticket marketplace partner of MLB — was $879 ($1,081 with fees) as of late Friday afternoon. That was for a seat high above the right-field corner. At the other end of the spectrum, one seller was seeking $12,750 each for club seats on the third row behind home plate at Saturday night’s game.

The Braves are in the World Series for the first time since 1999. They and the Astros split the first two games of the series in Houston.

A spokeswoman for another secondary-ticket marketplace, TickPick, said the average purchase price paid for tickets on that site was $1,286 for Friday’s game and $1,288 for Saturday’s.

The TickPick spokeswoman said one buyer purchased seven front-row seats in the 200 level behind home plate at Truist Park for $4,947 each, a total of $34,629.

Prices on the secondary (resale) market fluctuate frequently, sometimes minute to minute.

The Braves offered an “extremely limited” inventory of World Series tickets to the general public in a brief online sale Tuesday. Some fans found the prices higher than expected then because the Braves use a dynamic pricing model that adjusts the prices of single-game tickets based on demand.

The best prices were offered to season-ticket holders, who last month had the option of purchasing tickets to all potential postseason home games, but other fans paid significantly higher prices even when buying directly from the team.