Politically Georgia: An electric vehicle plant could jolt the state’s economy

120821 Rutledge: A local resident navigates the 4-way stop on East Main Street in historic downtown Rutledge on his way to the Caboose on Wednesday, Dec 8, 2021. Ed Hogan, owner of the Caboose restaurant, is opposed to the Rivian GA electric vehicle plant saying "it's going to be too many vehicles. There will be 200 cars out here. I don't know what other people want but we like it the way it is" .   “Curtis Compton / Curtis.Compton@ajc.com”`

Credit: Curtis Compton / Curtis.Compton@

Credit: Curtis Compton / Curtis.Compton@

120821 Rutledge: A local resident navigates the 4-way stop on East Main Street in historic downtown Rutledge on his way to the Caboose on Wednesday, Dec 8, 2021. Ed Hogan, owner of the Caboose restaurant, is opposed to the Rivian GA electric vehicle plant saying "it's going to be too many vehicles. There will be 200 cars out here. I don't know what other people want but we like it the way it is" . “Curtis Compton / Curtis.Compton@ajc.com”`

It might be one of the biggest economic development projects in Georgia history.

That’s why this episode of the Politically Georgia podcast is focused on the announcement that electric vehicle startup Rivian will build its next plant at a site along I-20 in Monroe and Walton Counties.

Atlanta-Journal Constitution Political Insider Greg Bluestein is joined by investigative reporter J. Scott Trubey to dig into the agreement.

Our journalists look at why it might take years to learn how big this deal really is, why some residents are worried and whether it will be worth the cost in tax incentives.