Georgia could receive $8.2 billion in new COVID-19 relief bill

DeKalb County Board of Health medical worker Sandra Armstead, right, explains a few possible symptoms of the COVID-19 vaccination to Rockdale County resident Larry Mitchell after she administered the vaccine to him. (Alyssa Pointer / Alyssa.Pointer@ajc.com)
DeKalb County Board of Health medical worker Sandra Armstead, right, explains a few possible symptoms of the COVID-19 vaccination to Rockdale County resident Larry Mitchell after she administered the vaccine to him. (Alyssa Pointer / Alyssa.Pointer@ajc.com)

Credit: Alyssa Pointer / Alyssa.Pointer@ajc.com

Credit: Alyssa Pointer / Alyssa.Pointer@ajc.com

WASHINGTON — Georgia cities and counties, as well as state agencies, stand to share in $8.2 billion in federal funding under the latest coronavirus relief proposal.

That number includes $4.7 billion that would come to the state and its agencies, plus $3.6 billion that would be sent directly to local governments, including all 159 counties. The House Oversight Committee revealed the latest numbers at its meeting Friday to debate the bill and consider amendments proposed by members.

The coronavirus relief package, a priority of President Joe Biden, must be approved in both chambers of Congress before heading to his desk. The entire package currently has a price tag of about $2 trillion and includes $350 billion in state and local funding.

That money will be used to help keep first responders and health care workers on the job, continue the rollout of the vaccine and provide aid to businesses affected by the pandemic.

Georgia’s counties stand to collectively receive $2 billion with the more populous ones receiving more money. For example, the most recent draft includes $208 million to Fulton County, $183 million for Gwinnett County and $149 million earmarked for DeKalb County.

Separately, Georgia’s cities would receive about $1.5 billion in block grants. That amount includes $164 million for Atlanta, $53 million for Savannah and $15 million for Sandy Springs. Smaller Georgia communities, 521 of them in all, would share about $500 million.

Columnist Jamie Dupree contributed to this article.

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