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Readers Write

PHIL SKINNER / PSKINNER@AJC.COM
PHIL SKINNER / PSKINNER@AJC.COM

Credit: pskinner@ajc.com

Credit: pskinner@ajc.com

Clear understanding of circumstances needed to fight virus

In March, COVID-19 and its implications were new to us. We were all in pretty much the same place trying to keep up with projections and expert opinions. Today we are four months smarter, so we should be thinking ahead. The numbers may go down, and we will act accordingly. They may go up, so we should be asking Gov. Brian Kemp: What criteria do you expect to follow to decide to re-escalate restrictions? Do you expect to allow cities and/or counties to escalate restrictions or stay with uniform statewide rules? Will you increase the communications campaign for common best practices and current restrictions to maintain support for them? Will you support businesses and other facilities that have greater restrictions? We can all make our own choices about how we will behave. Part of that is understanding what the future implications may be.

ROSS KENNEDY, ROSWELL

Politicians not concerned about COVID-19’s detriment to average folks

When unemployment insurance runs out and the moratorium on evictions ends, millions of families will be in dire circumstances. Homelessness will be as epidemic as COVID-19, and the anguish ordinary Americans experience will equal anything felt during the Great Depression. But having bailed out Wall Street, neither the administration nor Congress seems inclined to do anything to address the agony that will afflict everyday people. Contrast this with what’s being done in Germany, Ireland and elsewhere. It is obvious some governments provide for their citizens in a crisis, whereas ours supports only business and thinks that is sufficient. Sadly, the people affected won’t ever dare to challenge the powers that be.

DEAN POIRIER, LILBURN