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Credit: pskinner@ajc.com

Credit: pskinner@ajc.com

Wearing body armor while carrying firearm should be felony

The 2nd Amendment guarantees an individual’s right to own and carry a firearm. However, nothing in the Constitution guarantees the right to wear body armor. If wearing body armor while in possession of a firearm, except in the case of properly authorized police or protective activity, was made a felony, potential attackers could be arrested before their attack actually begins.

GAYLEN ROBERTS, CANTON

State well positioned to lead clean energy revolution

Kudos to Savannah for reeling in a new Hyundai electric car assembly plant creating 8,500 jobs, “Hyundai ready to announce Georgia plant” (News, May 13). This is one more example of new, clean technology powering Georgia’s economy.

Besides electric car assembly, Georgia is leading in generating solar energy and manufacturing solar panels. As a state with plentiful solar energy and willing workers but no fossil fuel deposits to speak of, Georgia is in a great position to help lead the clean energy revolution.

Building the new, zero-carbon Georgia can’t happen fast enough, as climate change poses an existential threat to human civilization. The signs of climate chaos are all around us in the form of wildfires, floods, and sea level rise. Georgians would be wise to support federal legislation to accelerate the decarbonization process. A powerful, conservative-friendly tool would be a price on carbon, encouraging innovation and showing companies like Hyundai that America means business about climate change.

DANIEL EVERETT, ATHENS

National debt a source of today’s inflation

The Senate voted 80-19 to reinstate Jerome Powell as Fed chief. Some in the minority who voted against reinstatement explained they voted against him because he had failed with respect to inflation.

Both major parties, but lately mainly Republicans, wail about inflation. The search for its cause mainly focuses on COVID and supply chain glitches. Recently, the war in Ukraine was added to the mix. Other than vague mentions of monetary policy, quantitative easing (i.e., money printing) is never included in the list of causes.

In 2021, very successful investment manager Ray Dalio wrote a book, “The Changing World Order.” In it, he explains the history of how The Netherlands eventually ceased being the world’s dominant country due to money printing necessitated by huge debt, followed by the British eventually doing the same.

He notes the U.S. is now in the process of doing the same. We will reap what we sow.

ALLEN BUCKLEY, ATLANTA

Faith communities must step up to help if Roe is overturned

Your recent “Religious Women Weigh in on Abortion: It’s Complicated” (AJC.com, May 13) covered a number of perspectives on abortion from women of faith.

As a Christian who also believes that life begins at conception, I agree with those quoted in this article that the faith community must now put its money and resources into helping women faced with unintended pregnancies if Roe vs. Wade is overturned.

I have often felt that the anti-abortion movement was long on platitudes but short on real solutions for those faced with the difficult decision of whether to carry a pregnancy to term. How do we help someone “choose life” when most are never made aware of resources outside of Planned Parenthood to help them. Faith communities have a lot of work to do.

TERESA COLLIER, SMYRNA