Should nonviolent Georgia felons be allowed to vote?

Voters waited over an hour to vote at Henry W. Grady High School in Atlanta on Tuesday Nov. 6, 2018. JOHN SPINK/JSPINK@AJC.COM

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Voters waited over an hour to vote at Henry W. Grady High School in Atlanta on Tuesday Nov. 6, 2018. JOHN SPINK/JSPINK@AJC.COM

A resolution introduced in the Georgia Senate calls for some nonviolent felons to get their voting rights back.

The proposal comes after voters approved a similar measure in Florida in November, automatically restoring the voting rights of about 1.5 million felons as long as they weren't convicted of sex offenses or murder.

In Georgia, Senate Resolution 153 would create a study committee to define which types of criminals should be eligible to vote. Currently, all felons are prohibited from voting in Georgia until they've completed their sentences.

"A blanket prohibition on nonviolent felons having the right to vote does not serve the state's compelling state interest in ensuring that persons are fully integrated into society," according to SR153, which was introduced last week by state Sen. Harold Jones, a Democrat from Augusta.

About 283,000 Georgians have lost their right to vote because they've been convicted of a felony, according to the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia.