Federal judicial nominee Steven Grimberg at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on April 30. Photo courtesy of the U.S. Senate Office of Photography.

Senate confirms former prosecutor for Atlanta federal court

Steven Grimberg’s federal judicial nomination was approved 75 to 18, with 22 Democrats voting with all Republicans present in favor.

Grimberg once prosecuted white-collar, cyber and economic crimes for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Atlanta and was a trial attorney for the Justice Department’s tax division. He left government work in 2018 for the global investigation firm Nardello & Co.

Grimberg also is an adjunct professor at the Emory University School of Law, where he received his law degree.

He had the early support of both of Georgia’s U.S. senators.

Johnny Isakson said Grimberg “has a distinguished record of upholding the law.”

“His deep knowledge of economic crimes and cybersecurity threats will serve him well on the federal bench,” the retiring three-term Republican said.

David Perdue, Isakson’s GOP colleague, said he’s “confident Steven Grimberg will continue to serve Georgia with integrity in this new role, just as he has throughout his impressive legal career.”

Grimberg’s pathway to confirmation was relatively speedy and drama-free. He was first nominated by President Donald Trump in April, and his nomination quickly moved to the Senate floor as Majority Leader Mitch McConnell emphasized the confirmation of conservative federal judges.

Grimberg will succeed Richard Story, who became a senior judge in December with a reduced caseload.

He’s the sixth Georgia-based federal district judge nominated by Trump and the fourth for the 11-judge Northern District, which is based in Atlanta and has branches in Gainesville, Newnan and Rome.

Grimberg’s confirmation comes less than three months after senators confirmed DeKalb County Superior Court Judge J.P. Boulee for a seat on the same district court bench. Judges Michael Brown and Billy Ray both began their federal service in 2018.

Staff writer Bill Rankin contributed to this article.

X