Scottish genealogist’s work is a gold mine of information

040316 ROSWELL, GA: Names and dates line the voluminous records at the Church of Latter Day Saints Family History Center, where people come to research their family's genealogy. Family History Center at 500 Norcross Street in Roswell. For Helen Cauley feature on Geneaology - Family Trees. (Parker C. Smith/Special)

Credit: Special

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040316 ROSWELL, GA: Names and dates line the voluminous records at the Church of Latter Day Saints Family History Center, where people come to research their family's genealogy. Family History Center at 500 Norcross Street in Roswell. For Helen Cauley feature on Geneaology - Family Trees. (Parker C. Smith/Special)

Credit: Special

David Dobson, the Scottish genealogist and historian, is still publishing and reprinting his works on the people of Scotland and, sometimes, their arrival in America.

“Scottish Soldiers in Colonial America, Part Six” lists soldiers in alphabetical order, with their service and the source of the information. The McIntoshes of early Georgia are included. Again, this is part six of an ongoing series, so the person you’re researching could be in any of the volumes. Dobson continues his “The People of” series with books on “Aberdeen at Home and Abroad, 1800-1850,” “Northern Highlands and Isles, 1800-1850” and “Perth and Kinross, 1800-1850.” All are in the same format, alphabetical listings of names with a short paragraph/statement of where they lived and what he learned about them, and then the source citation.

If you find your people in any of his volumes, it’s a gold mine. But you may have to go to a large genealogy collection in order to review all his published works in one place. All of the four volumes named above are published by the Clearfield Company, part of the Genealogical Publishing Company of Baltimore. See its website Genealogical.com for how to order or call 1-800-296-6687. You can get on the publisher’s free email listing and receive timely updates on new books as well as detailed essays, for free, on various genealogy topics and books. The company is the leading genealogy book publisher in the nation.

Indexing projects/crowdsourcing

There are a number of major institutions that still need indexers as more and more collections are digitized and placed online. Diane Richard, in an article in the February/March 2022 issue of Internet Genealogy, covered lots of these, many with project blogs on Facebook or Twitter. If that is something you might want to try, search online for projects. At the Library of Congress website, it’s found under “Crowd,” and at the National Archives (NARA) site under “Citizen Archivist Missions.” One site that seems to list a lot of projects to choose from is zooniverse.org.

Dog DNA

If you are interested in your dog’s DNA, check out purewow.com and search for “dog DNA” to see a review of dog test kits.

Contact Kenneth H. Thomas Jr., P. O. Box 901, Decatur, Ga., 30031 or www.kenthomasongenealogy.com.