Readers Write

Speed limits on Lake Lanier

On March 15th, the operator of a rented cabin cruiser passed between a high-ground marker and the shore, subsequently grounding and flipping a 36-foot Monterrey. His wife died. It was dark when this accident happened. An experienced boater would have known to slow his pace, especially if navigating unfamiliar waters. A quick crunch of Georgia’s DNR boating statistics does not bode well for Lake Lanier. Lanier plays host to some high-speed stupidity. The numbers do not reflect the myriad close calls or near misses that happen daily.

So what do we, the people, do? We start raising Cain six ways from Dixie and get a speed limit put in place for Lanier. Until then, step up and be part of the solution; learn the ways of the water.

CATE ELDER, CUMMING

Tweak us out of LaVista Hills

We didn’t realize how easy tweaking was. “Tweak” and just like that, 2000 people are moved from one city proposal to another. (“LaVista Hills, Tuker border tweaked in Senate,” News, March 20). Our home is in Toco Hill on the southern edge of the proposed LaVista Hills and we’d like to be tweaked out of it. North and north central DeKalb County residents have become pawns in the misguided ambitions of a few. With all the changes made by the Senate and House, it’s vital the feasibility of these proposals be revisited. The LaVista Hills boundaries have bled commercial property to the Tucker proposal and Brookhaven’s annexation of Executive Park. As reconfigured, LaVista Hills is almost entirely residential. Even including Toco Hills shopping center and Northlake mall, there appears to be insufficient commercial or industrial property to support the tax base to start a city, provide services and maintain the quality of life for 67,000 residents without raising residential property taxes. LaVista Hills fails to measure up as a city.

RICHARD PEAVY, PATRICK CRANE, ATLANTA

Don’t bet on the Final Four

We have two legal multi-state lotteries, more scratch-off games then you can count, but you better not bet on the Final Four or ask the Legislature to approval horse-track wagering. The police raided an Alpharetta sports bar for having a “Calcutta” type event. Seems like a perfect use of the police department’s time and resources. I saw some construction workers pitching quarters to a line on Monday. The police will be after them next or the Final Four “game” in an Atlanta law office.

TONY V. PARROTT, FAYETTEVILLE

About the Author