READERS WRITE: DEC. 9

Editorial wrongly overlooked lack of Ga. healthcare

I am writing in response to Andre Jackson’s editorial on Sunday, Dec. 2. His statement “After all, we’re in a good place now, but still not where the state should be.” Andre then went on to mention several issues, but he made no mention of the many citizens with no access to healthcare. Of the 159 counties, 64 have no pediatrician, 79 have no obstetrician, and NINE have no doctors. Gov. Nathan Deal refused to expand Medicaid, which was a cruel act on his part. Incoming Gov. Brian Kemp, I am sure, will follow in his footsteps.

Healthcare is a right, not a privilege.

JEANNE MONTGOMERY, DECATUR

Don’t fraudulently ‘contextualize’ history, monuments

The current fad of “contextualization” of Confederate and other historic monuments is a fraud. Unless the so-called contextualization is itself contextualized and scrutinized for historical accuracy, what we are getting is political correctness, political agenda and an attack on American history. Those groups doing the “contextualization” have been handpicked, and the results have been pre-determined. To look back 150 years and make moral judgments based on modern-day, politically correct standards without understanding the standards of that time is quite arrogant, and ignorant. Citizens should realize the destruction of accurate American history is simply one of the known Marxist methods for upending our nation. It is Marxist indoctrination of our “educators” that have made contextualism seem reasonable when it should be considered obvious deceit.

ERNEST WADE, LOGANVILLE

GOP senators need to act on immigration fix

The AJC recently reported on Sen. Johnny Isakson’s advice to Republicans reeling from the suburban Atlanta blue wave, saying that “[Georgia is] a growth state… And if you’re going to win you better cater to your electorate,” adding that Republicans ignore immigrant, Latino and African-American communities at their own peril.

Isakson can now lead by example and provide a long-term legislative solution for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which court rulings have extended, but could end following Supreme Court review soon.

Without a solution, Georgia’s almost 25,000 DACA recipients could be ripped from our state, resulting in almost $1 billion in annual GDP loss and $24 million in state and local tax revenue loss.

A DACA legislative fix caters to the electorate. If nothing is done, Republicans will again ignore their communities at their own peril. I hope that senators Isakson and Perdue pass a solution for Dreamers soon.

CHARLES KUCK, IMMIGRATION ATTORNEY, ROSWELL

Goodheartedness can prove deadly

Leonard Pitts Jr. questions America’s soul following the recent tear-gassing of migrant border breakers (“Gassing of migrants reveals smallness of America,” Opinion, Dec. 2). He mentions that Obama’s Border Patrol may have routinely performed the same way, but his ire is primarily focused on President Trump and that migrant children were among those tear-gassed. Pitts fails to mention these children, along with caravan women, were strategically placed as human shields at the fore of the border breakers’ phalanx. And he ignores the role this caravan plays in measuring U.S. resolve to protect itself. Pitts’ goodheartedness is matched by shortsightedness — characteristics he apparently shares with Jacquelyn Smith, who in Baltimore on Dec. 1 rolled down her car window to give money to a roadside woman purportedly holding an infant and a sign saying, “Please help me feed my baby.” Ms. Smith wound up stabbed to death.

GREGORY MARSHALL, MARIETTA

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