Snellville chooses finalists to develop 2040 Comprehensive Plan. Courtesy City of Snellville
Photo: For the AJC
Photo: For the AJC

Snellville approves senior housing near future Towne Center project

Snellville City Council has approved an 88-unit senior housing development on a site near the city’s planned Towne Center project.

The building, housing one- and two-bedroom units, will be built on land currently owned by the Snellville United Methodist Church, the city said in a release. Currently, the majority of that land is taken up by a parking lot.


READ | Gwinnett country club golf course could become 250+ senior homes


The 111,412-square-foot building at the corner of Henry Clower Boulevard and Pate Street would house residents aged 55 and older, according to a city release. In addition to the 88 apartments, the development will include a clubhouse and outdoor space with yet-to-be-determined amenities. Some possibilities include a hair salon, an exercise room, a garden area and a shuffleboard court.

The development will also be close to Snellville’s senior center, which offers meals and recreational programming to members. Gwinnett County has recently increased its senior center offerings due to a “huge” demand from the aging population in the Snellville area. A developer has also submitted plans for a gated senior community with more than 250 homes on land currently owned by Summit Chase Country Club.

Demand for senior services and living spaces is particularly high in southeast Gwinnett because it was the first area in the county to see significant population growth, said Blake Hawkins, deputy director for community services, in a January interview.

Towne Center, a key element of the city’s 2040 Comprehensive Plan, is designed to be a central meeting place for Snellville residents. Plans for the area include a new library, homes, retail space and a “city market.”


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Many people still rely on the sirens when severe weather impacts the area.

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