Members of the Dunwoody City Council listen to citizens during a meeting Monday. (Alyssa Pointer/alyssa.pointer@ajc.com)
Photo: Alyssa Pointer/alyssa.pointer@ajc.com
Photo: Alyssa Pointer/alyssa.pointer@ajc.com

Dunwoody joins growing list of cities with non-discrimination ordinances

Dunwoody is the latest city in metro Atlanta to adopt an ordinance protecting against discrimination from businesses.

The measure, which passed unanimously at Monday’s City Council meeting, outlaws discrimination on the basis of race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age, disability and other traits. The ordinance spells out a process for people to file a complaint with the city if they feel they were discriminated against, and gives Dunwoody the ability to investigate those claims.

Dunwoody is the fifth city in the state, and the fourth in DeKalb County, to pass a non-discrimination ordinance. Atlanta passed its ordinance nearly 20 years ago. Last year, Doraville passed a similar measure; Clarkston and Chamblee followed suit this spring.


PREVIOUS COVERAGE:

» New Doraville ordinance targets discrimination by business owners

» Clarkston becomes 3rd city to pass non-discrimination ordinance

» Chamblee passes non-discrimination law


The Dunwoody ordinance also formalizes a process currently in place instructing the police department to receive training on identifying hate crimes and report those statistics to the FBI.

The council did not discuss the measure before passing it. During the public comment period, several residents spoke in support of the ordinance, including Allison Padilla-Goodman, the southeast regional director of the Anti-Defamation League.

Allison Padilla-Goodman, the southeast regional director of the Anti-Defamation League, thanks members of the Dunwoody City Council for taking up the non-discrimination ordinance Monday evening. (Alyssa Pointer/alyssa.pointer@ajc.com)
Photo: Alyssa Pointer/alyssa.pointer@ajc.com

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