A police evidence copy of Geddy Kramer's FedEx identification card. Kramer's bid for mass-murder nortoriety was supposed to take place a year earlier at North Cobb High School, rather than at the Kennesaw FedEx warehouse where he worked. His case seems to debunk the theory that mass shootings can be predicted and prevented.
Photo: HANDOUT
Photo: HANDOUT

FedEx shooter failed in quest for infamy

Many rituals follow mass shootings in the United States, prominent among them a search for meaning — for the hidden clues that would somehow make sense of why the shooter snapped; for the missed signals that, if detected in time, might have forestalled the tragedy.

But a close examination of Geddy Kramer's final months finds no obvious cause for his April 29 rampage through the Kennesaw FedEx warehouse where he worked. It suggests no dramatic descent into madness. And, perhaps most important, it reveals nothing that Kramer did that necessarily would have alerted anyone to the looming assault.

Kramer's case shows the difficulty of predicting and preventing acts of mass violence, and of understanding what drives its perpetrators.

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