DNA for Native American Genealogy book published

040316 ROSWELL, GA: Names and dates line the voluminous records at the Church of Latter Day Saints Family History Center, where people come to research their family's genealogy. Family History Center at 500 Norcross Street in Roswell. For Helen Cauley feature on Geneaology - Family Trees. (Parker C. Smith/Special)

Credit: Special

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040316 ROSWELL, GA: Names and dates line the voluminous records at the Church of Latter Day Saints Family History Center, where people come to research their family's genealogy. Family History Center at 500 Norcross Street in Roswell. For Helen Cauley feature on Geneaology - Family Trees. (Parker C. Smith/Special)

Credit: Special

One of the questions I’m most frequently asked when I’m lecturing on genealogy research is whether people can prove their Native American ancestry through DNA testing.

In a newly released book, “DNA for Native American Genealogy,” Roberta Estes covers all the questions people might have in her very thorough approach to the subject. Estes is a noted DNA speaker and blogger at DNA-explained.com, a scientist and has written for the nativeheritageproject.com. The introduction in this 190-page, softcover book sets the tone by laying out why you need to read the entire book to understand what can and cannot be proven. In chapter one, Estes answers “Can DNA Results Identify a Tribe?” She also discusses common family lore and what can be believed. Among the other issues examined in the book are ethnicity and population genetics, DNA testing companies and what they offer that researchers must use in their quest and the haplogroups associated with Native Americans.

Needless to say, this is a very important and long-overdue work. Anyone seriously trying to sort out a Native American story in their family should invest in this book. It is available for $34.95 plus shipping from the Genealogical Publishing Co. of Baltimore via genealogical.com or by calling 800-296-6687.

1921 English Census

The 1921 census of England and Wales was released to the public this month. It is important due to the loss of the 1931 census and the fact that the 1941 census was not taken due to the war. The census can be found on FindmyPast.com. Scotland’s 1921 census will be released separately.

Florida and Missouri research

The January/February issue of Family Tree Magazine, on newsstands now, includes four-page research guides covering Florida and Missouri. Check it out if you have ancestors in those states. If you can’t pick up a copy, see familytreemagazine.com.

Contact Kenneth H. Thomas Jr., P. O. Box 901, Decatur, Ga., 30031 or at www.kenthomasongenealogy.com.