7.4-magnitude earthquake rocks Alaska

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Several major earthquakes shook Alaska on Monday afternoon which sent ripples across the Pacific Ocean, according to reports.

The first to hit the region was a 7.4-magnitude quake, which reportedly occurred 58 miles southeast of Sand Point and triggered an emergency tsunami warning from the U.S. Geological Survey, reports said.

The warning was in effect for South Alaska and the entire Alaska Peninsula, according to the National Weather Service.

There were no immediate reports of damage or casualties. A U.S. Coast Guard helicopter was monitoring the region from the air, reports said.

Tsunami sirens were reportedly blaring in Sand Point, about 575 miles southwest of Anchorage.

The main temblor had not yet been reviewed by a seismologist, according to quake observers in the far reaches of the Bering Sea.

Officials in Japan, nearly 3,000 miles away, also reported there was no threat from a tsunami.

A short time after the first impact, two more quakes measuring 5.7 and 5.6-magnitude struck off the coast of Alaska, reports said.

Sand Point is on the northwest range of Popof Island, which is part of the Aleutian island archipelago.

Warnings went out in parts of southern Alaska, too, including Kodiak and Homer, reports said.

Reports from the region confirmed the seismic event shortly before 1 p.m. local time.

King Cove city administrator Gary Hennigh said the quake was felt in the Alaska Peninsula community but everything seemed to be intact, according to Tribune News Service.

“Residents and cannery workers are evacuating to higher ground until we know more about the tsunami warning,” Hennigh said.

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