Annual list of best genealogy websites published

040316 ROSWELL, GA: Names and dates line the voluminous records at the Church of Latter Day Saints Family History Center, where people come to research their family's genealogy. Family History Center at 500 Norcross Street in Roswell. For Helen Cauley feature on Geneaology - Family Trees. (Parker C. Smith/Special)

Credit: Special

Combined ShapeCaption
040316 ROSWELL, GA: Names and dates line the voluminous records at the Church of Latter Day Saints Family History Center, where people come to research their family's genealogy. Family History Center at 500 Norcross Street in Roswell. For Helen Cauley feature on Geneaology - Family Trees. (Parker C. Smith/Special)

Credit: Special

FamilyTreeMagazine.com has just released its annual list of 101 Best Genealogy Websites.

This is always a great resource to find out about new websites and be reminded of standbys, such as Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org, as well as websites maintained by the National Archives for the U.S. and the United Kingdom, the Library of Congress (loc.gov), and so forth.

The list covers each state and many countries. Major U.S. websites of interest are American Ancestors (Americanancestors.org), the Genealogical Publishing Co. (Genealogical.com), the New York Public Library Digital Collection (digitalcollections.nypl.org), Reclaim the Records (reclaimtherecords.org), and the nationally important USGENWEB (usgenweb.org). I always like to check out those websites that are listed as new or revised, or ones that I have never heard of. Take a look at Names in Stone (namesinstone.com), another cemetery/burial site; NewspaperArchive.com, a great new newspaper site that I have used a lot; Arcanum maps (Arcanum.com/en) which specializes in Europe; and DeadFred (deadfred.com), which is not new but is new to this list and allows people to look for lost photos. So check out the magazine on newsstands now, or at familytreemagazine.com.

Family reunions, how to share

“Ten Ways to Share Genealogy at Your Family Reunion” appeared in the June/July issue of Internet Genealogy. The recommendations are: have a reunion theme; have a family tree display; host a photo scan station; mount a photo board of family pictures; present a digital slideshow or video; set up an oral history circle for sharing stories; have a family trivia game; share family recipes; schedule genealogy activities or a research trip to the town where the ancestors came from; and lastly, put together a family history book or another publication. All great ideas to be considered as you plan a reunion.

What is your earliest ancestor photo?

Who is the earliest ancestor you have a photograph or daguerreotype of? I have one of my ancestor Lezina Daniel Brooks, (1786-1873). So think about what you have.

Contact Kenneth H. Thomas Jr., P. O. Box 901, Decatur, Ga., 30031 or kenthomasongenealogy.com.