Johns Creek approves new subdivision despite nearby residents’ concerns

The Providence Group plans to build single-family homes priced at $850,000 on Abbotts Bridge and Parsons Roads. The developer received the rezoning approval needed for the project during a meeting Monday. (Courtesy City of Johns Creek)

Combined ShapeCaption
The Providence Group plans to build single-family homes priced at $850,000 on Abbotts Bridge and Parsons Roads. The developer received the rezoning approval needed for the project during a meeting Monday. (Courtesy City of Johns Creek)

A planned subdivision in Johns Creek rebuffed by nearby residents has been downsized and approved by City Council.

The Providence Group plans to build single-family homes priced at $850,000 on Abbotts Bridge and Parsons Roads. The developer received the rezoning approval needed for the project during a meeting Monday.

Providence lowered the number of homes to be built from 37 to 29 weeks ago, but the developer will only be allowed to build a maximum of 20 homes under the conditions for the rezoning.

Residents in attendance at the meeting objected to the decision saying the subdivision brings too much density to the neighborhood.

During public comment, residents said the builder’s proposed 5,000-square-foot lots are not comparable to spacious subdivisions in the area and don’t fit for the city’s comprehensive land use plan.

The new subdivision will be located on 10 acres in the Medlock community between a dental office and a synagogue.

The property, rezoned from agricultural use, is limited to having two homes per acre under the conditions presented by Councilman Larry DiBiasi.

Chris Coughlin, the sole council member who voted against the rezoning, said the project is a departure from the comprehensive plan.

“I’m pretty liberal on certain cases where we do deviate but I do treat the (comprehensive plan) as a binding guide because people do buy their homes, buy their locations with that promise made to them ...”

Providence has built several subdivisions in Johns Creek including neighborhoods with similar density to what the company had wanted to build, Warren Jolly, president of Providence, told City Council.

“People don’t want 18,000-square-foot lots anymore. They want small lots, community spaces,” he said.