The last surviving dog from Michael Vick’s dogfighting ring has died

The last living dog who was picked up during a 2007 raid of Michael Vick's Virginia property for dogfighting has died. BADRAP animal rescue

Credit: BADRAP Animal r

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The last living dog who was picked up during a 2007 raid of Michael Vick's Virginia property for dogfighting has died. BADRAP animal rescue

Credit: BADRAP Animal r

Credit: BADRAP Animal r

Frodo was one of 49 dogs captured in 2007 from Bad Newz Kennels, 47 of whom were rehabilitated.

The last surviving dog from former NFL quarterback Michael Vick’s dogfighting ring has died, according to the animal welfare non-profit BAD RAP.

Frodo, a pit bull who was estimated to be about 15 years old, “transitioned” this past weekend “to be with the rest of the dogs from the group,” BADRAP wrote on its Facebook page.

He was one of 49 dogs rescued in 2007 from Bad Newz Kennel dogfighting ring on Vick’s property in Smithfield, Virginia. Two had to be put down but the 47 others were rehabilitated and placed with families and rescue groups all over the country.

Kim and Tony Ramirez adopted Frodo in 2007 and live in Fremont, California.

“The last 14 years of [Frodo’s] life were spent being pampered like a prince with the Ramirez family and dogs,” the post read. “Sweet Frodo - How we loved him. He was one of the bravest survivors we’ve ever met.” Two other dogs from that ring recently passed as well, the post noted.

In 2007, when the police raided his compound, Vick was the star quarterback for the Atlanta Falcons, the highest paid player in the NFL. Vick spent 18 months in prison for financing the dogfighting ring for six years. He later spent seven more years in the NFL with three other teams, retiring in 2016.

VIck eventually took full responsibility for his misdeeds, apologizing and making amends by spending time and money working to stop dogfighting in the years following his time in prison.

The Washington Post in 2019 tracked down the status of all 47 dogs, 11 of whom were still alive at the time of the reporting. “They landed in homes from California to Rhode Island, embraced by people with jobs ranging from preschool teacher to attorney,” the story said. “Some adopters love sports. Others had never heard of Vick. Some of the dogs struggled to heal emotionally and remained fearful through their lives. But they all found homes far more loving than the horror-film kennel that made headlines around the globe.”

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