OWN’s ‘Iyanla: Fix My Life’ ending after nearly a decade on air

Iyanla Vanzant gives Neffe Pugh a dressing down on the first episode of season 5 of OWN's "Iyanla: Fix My Life" Saturday, April 15, 2017. CREDIT: OWN
Iyanla Vanzant gives Neffe Pugh a dressing down on the first episode of season 5 of OWN's "Iyanla: Fix My Life" Saturday, April 15, 2017. CREDIT: OWN

Credit: Rodney Ho

Credit: Rodney Ho

She has shot several recent seasons in metro Atlanta

Life coach Iyanla Vanzant is retiring her OWN show “Iyanla: Fix My Life” after nearly a decade of shows.

The final batch of episodes for what is being deemed season eight start airing April 10.

The show features Vanzant spending several days with a person or family to figure out their issues, be it an addiction, relationship conflicts or childhood traumas.

“Fix My Life” debuted in 2012 and has been a consistently strong performer for the network, mostly airing on Saturday nights.

Vanzant has worked with many Atlanta women including former “The Real Housewives of Atlanta” cast member Sheree Whitfield, R&B singer Syleena Johnson, reality star Trina Braxton and radio personality Sasha the Diva. She had major conflicts with rap star DMX and was boggled by an Atlanta man Jay Williams who had fathered 34 children with 17 women. She took a trip to Ferguson, Missouri, after the Michael Brown shooting in 2014 and counseled survivors of the 2016 Pulse nightclub shootings in Orlando in 2016.

During the first few seasons, Vanzant traveled around the country to meet with clients. In the last few seasons, she rented a home in metro Atlanta and brought subjects there to hash out their problems.

A two-hour farewell special will air on Saturday, May 22 at 9 p.m.

Oprah Winfrey brought Vanzant on her talk show as a guest and when she started the OWN network gave her the show.

“The minute Iyanla stepped onto the stage of ‘The Oprah Winfrey Show,’ I knew she had a talent that was meant to be shared, and I am glad that she created the perfect vehicle to provide OWN viewers with her healing magic,” said Winfrey, OWN’s CEO in a statement. “Sunsetting the series is bittersweet. I’m very thankful for her and the work she does and look forward to what unfolds next from her gift of teaching people to be better versions of themselves.”

Vanzant added: “In my heart of hearts, I believe that ‘Fix My Life’ has contributed to the creation of a new genre of television programming, where people get to speak and see how to address issues that have been taboo.”

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