Harrison Family Farm Classic Southern Eudora Chow Chow/Provided by Nina Hild Cunard

Buy This: Three relishes to perk up summer meals 

Just in time for summer hot dogs, potato salad, deviled eggs and more, we sampled three relishes based on three different vegetables. Miles of hot dogs were consumed in the process. You may thank us later. 

Harrison Family Farm Classic Southern Eudora Chow Chow 

I think of chow chow as a Southern thing but I just learned that it’s chow chow made from cabbage that qualifies as “Southern.” (There are other chow chows? Who knew?) And chow chow made mostly from cabbage is just what Roger Harrison of Harrison Family Farm in Eudora, Georgia, is putting up. Harrison says the recipe originated with his grandmother’s side of the family, folks who originally settled in Georgia’s Jasper County in the 1700s. Eudora Chow Chow is named for the farm’s community and “Eudora” has become the nickname of Harrison’s grandmother, Liz. This chow chow is definitely not sweet, although there’s a little sugar in the recipe. It’s tangy with cider vinegar and savory from the onions, peppers and celery seed, but it’s definitely about the cabbage. Visit Little’s Food Store in Cabbagetown (how appropriate is that?) and you might find they’re serving Harrison Family Farm chow chow on their hot dog (which is how we tried it) or as a special on their famous (delicious) hamburger. 

$6.99 per 16-ounce jar. Available at Little’s Food Store, 198 Carroll Street, Atlanta. harrisonfamily.farm/home.html

Emil’s Jerusalem Artichoke Relish/Provided by Charleston Specialty Foods

Emil’s Jerusalem Artichoke Relish 

Jerusalem artichokes are the vegetable you may know as a “sunchoke.” The edible part is the tuber from which grows a tall plant with pretty yellow flowers that look like small sunflowers. Turning the tubers into relish is the most popular way to preserve the. Emil Emanuel of Emil’s Gourmet in Charleston, South Carolina, makes his artichoke relish with local sourced Jerusalem artichokes. They’re very finely chopped, then mixed with bell pepper, onion, cider vinegar, some sugar and spices to make this sweet and tangy condiment. The Jerusalem artichokes provide an earthy flavor that underpins all those seasonings. The texture of this relish is perfect for spreading on a sandwich (try it in your next grilled cheese) or for topping hot dogs and grilled sausages. 

$5.99 per 8-ounce jar, $9.99 per 16-ounce jar. Available at charlestonspecialtyfoods.com/products/emils-jerusalem-artichoke-relishhttps://emilsgourmet.com/ 

LeAnn’s Gourmet Zucchini Relish/Provided by LeAnn's Gourmet Foods

LeAnn’s Gourmet Zucchini Relish 

This naturally bright green relish is one that will appeal to everyone dining at your table. The finely chopped vegetables (zucchini, onion, green bell pepper and banana pepper) are mixed with just enough vinegar, sugar and spice to make a more sophisticated relish than the dyed green cucumber relish you may have grown up with. We found it appealed to all ages. Not too tangy, not too sharp, just right. It’s the brainchild of Hampton, Georgia-based Michelle Pyrtle and Tracy North of LeAnn’s Gourmet Foods. (It turns out “LeAnn” is middle name of both Pyrtle and North’s daughters.) This relish was the inspiration for their business which also includes Rutabaga’s Market & Cafe in Hampton. We think it’s perfect for stirring into tuna salad or egg salad. You’ll have lots of ideas of your own. 

$5.99 per 9-ounce jar. Available at Rutabaga’s Market & Cafe, 1 Cherry Street, Hampton, Branch & Vine in Peachtree City and online at leannsgourmetfoods.com/

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