Warnock races to contrast himself with Loeffler in Senate runoff

11/03/2020 —  Atlanta, Georgia — Raphael Warnock, Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate, makes remarks at his headquarters on Election Day in Atlanta’s Sweet Auburn District, Tuesday, November 3, 2020. Warnock is expected to advance to a run-off election in January against a Republican opponent. (Alyssa Pointer / Alyssa.Pointer@ajc.com)
11/03/2020 — Atlanta, Georgia — Raphael Warnock, Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate, makes remarks at his headquarters on Election Day in Atlanta’s Sweet Auburn District, Tuesday, November 3, 2020. Warnock is expected to advance to a run-off election in January against a Republican opponent. (Alyssa Pointer / Alyssa.Pointer@ajc.com)

Credit: Alyssa Pointer / Alyssa.Pointer@ajc.com

Credit: Alyssa Pointer / Alyssa.Pointer@ajc.com

‘If you’re looking for a billionaire ...’

Democrat Raphael Warnock raced to contrast himself with Republican U.S. Sen. Kelly Loeffler on Tuesday with a minute-long TV ad that opens by declaring “people like me aren’t supposed to run for office.”

The ad features Warnock, pastor of Atlanta’s Ebenezer Baptist Church, ironing his shirt and preparing for the day as he talks of his humble upbringing in the housing projects of Savannah. It never overtly mentioned Loeffler, a wealthy former financial executive, though the intent was clear.

“This race for Senate is about who you think best represents you. If you’re looking for a billionaire, I’m not your guy,” he said in the ad. “But if you want someone who’s been through some of the same challenges as you, I’m Raphael Warnock and it would be my honor to serve you.”

The TV spot is already the second ad launched by Warnock since he landed a place in the Jan. 5 runoff against Loeffler, whose husband Jeff Sprecher owns the Atlanta-based company that runs the New York Stock Exchange.

It’s one of two runoffs that could determine control of the U.S. Senate. Democrat Jon Ossoff faces U.S. Sen. David Perdue in the other contest.

Warnock echoes an argument that Republican U.S. Rep. Doug Collins leveled throughout the campaign at Loeffler, who grew up on a soybean farm in rural Illinois and worked a series of corporate jobs before she arrived in Atlanta.

It also serves as a fresh debut of sorts for Warnock, who captured about one-third of the vote in the chaotic November special election and is now trying to energize a base of Democratic voters to turn out in January for another high-stakes election.

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