House fails to impeach Homeland Security chief Mayorkas

GOP defections doom effort led by Rep. Greene
Legislation containing the articles of impeachment against Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas cites two charges against him: that he willfully refused to enforce border policies and that he breached the public trust. (AP Photo/Stephanie Scarbrough, File)

Credit: AP

Credit: AP

Legislation containing the articles of impeachment against Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas cites two charges against him: that he willfully refused to enforce border policies and that he breached the public trust. (AP Photo/Stephanie Scarbrough, File)

WASHINGTON — A vote to impeach Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas failed in the U.S. House Tuesday when a few Republicans joined Democrats to vote against the resolution.

The 214-216 vote doomed the measure — for now — despite a campaign by U.S. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Rome, on conservative media to remove Mayorkas from office. Green was the primary sponsor of the legislation containing the articles of impeachment which accused the secretary of refusing to enforce border policies and breaching public trust.

“His willful refusal to enforce the law has resulted in the most egregious national security crisis in the history of our country,” Greene said prior to the vote. “Democrats are in a quandary; either they must own the policies of murder and crime of American citizens, or they can admit Secretary Mayorkas has broken federal laws and vote to impeach Secretary Mayorkas.”

There were four Republican “no” votes for impeachment, but none from Georgia. The Georgia delegation voted along party lines.

Had the effort succeeded, House Speaker Mike Johnson, R-Louisiana, planned to name Greene as one of 11 impeachment managers appointed to argue the case against Mayorkas during a Senate trial.

Democrats were solid in opposing the effort and voted against bringing the resolution to a floor vote. They said Republicans who dislike President Joe Biden’s immigration policies and disagree with Mayorkas’ leadership have made no claims that reach the “high crimes and misdemeanors” threshold outlined in the Constitution as impeachable offenses.

Democrats also pointed to Greene’s support as evidence that the impeachment is politically motivated.

“Republican leaders told their donors behind closed doors they were going to impeach Mayorkas before they even began their sham investigation,” said Rep. Jim McGovern of Massachusetts, the top-ranking Democrat on the agenda-setting Rules Committee. “They raised money off this. They promised Marjorie Taylor Greene last year they were going to impeach no matter what in order to help Donald Trump distract from his legal troubles and their own incompetence.”


HOW THEY VOTED ON H.RES. 863, impeaching Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas

“Yes”

U.S. Rep. Rick Allen, R-Augusta

U.S. Rep. Buddy Carter, R-St. Simon Island

U.S. Rep. Andrew Clyde, R-Athens

U.S. Rep. Mike Collins, R-Jackson

U.S. Rep. Drew Ferguson, R-The Rock

U.S. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Rome

U.S. Rep. Barry Loudermilk, R-Cassville

U.S. Rep. Rich McCormick, R-Suwanee

U.S. Rep. Austin Scott, R-Tifton

“No”

U.S. Rep. Sanford Bishop, D-Albany

U.S. Rep. Hank Johnson, D-Lithonia

U.S. Rep. Lucy McBath, D-Marietta

U.S. Rep. David Scott, D-Atlanta

U.S. Rep. Nikema Williams, D-Atlanta