Readers write

Credit: pskinner@ajc.com

Credit: pskinner@ajc.com

Praise for legislation that can help slow climate change

Let’s celebrate the Inflation Reduction Act, the most important federal environmental action since the 1970 Clean Air Act signed by Richard Nixon!

It could help the United States cut greenhouse gas emissions to 40% below 2005 levels by 2030 by increasing the production rate of solar panels, wind turbines, batteries and electric vehicles. It provides funding to help mitigate climate injustice that has been perpetuated on the poor, who are more likely to live near toxic waste-producing power plants and in areas most impacted by the effects of climate change. It cannot stop all devastating floods experienced by Kentucky or the fires racing across California. Still, it can slow the increase in the number of such climate change-caused disasters.

Celebrate by turning up your thermostat a few degrees, enjoying a nice walk and signing up to campaign for your candidates who promise to do what it takes to slow climate change and save a livable world for future generations.

NANCY JO KIRK, KENNESAW

Switching to EVs puts road funds in doubt

The latest bill coming from Congress includes incentives to purchase electric vehicles. While this is certain to improve air quality, it may result in our highways and bridges falling into worse shape as electric vehicles would not be purchasing gas, and the fuel tax on gas contributes a large share of the costs for infrastructure improvements. What new tax will be implemented to make up for the reduced fuel tax income? A tax on tires might work but may result in many drivers driving on unsafe tires as they postpone buying new tires. A tax on vehicles themselves might work, but that would not be fair as drivers who drive less pay the same as those who drive more. Perhaps legislators need to look harder at the overall picture.

MIKE DEAL, ALPHARETTA