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Credit: pskinner@ajc.com

Credit: pskinner@ajc.com

Reasonable compromises are possible in abortion issue

The issue of abortion should have been resolved decades ago by adopting reasonable restrictions, as almost the entire world has done. Instead, the extremists on each side will only be satisfied with having it all their way -- total restrictions or no restrictions.

We should look to Europe as an example. Liberals routinely laud Europe for its progressive solutions. Typically, in Europe, abortions are restricted to the first 12-15 weeks. There are waiting periods, and counseling can be required before the abortion. Parental notification and approval can be required for those underaged. These are reasonable compromises. It is about time we join the civilized world and adopt similar laws.

MICHAEL G. MITCHELL, MARIETTA

Democrats ignore polls then complain about conservative court

The Democrats seem to think their point of view and beliefs are more important and more legitimate than the Republicans.

This shallow way of thinking could cause Democrats to lose big-time in the mid-term elections and beyond. By hiding their heads in the sand of self-righteousness and moral superiority, their eyes are closed to what most Americans think. Recent polls show the Democrats underwater in all areas -- the economy/inflation, immigration, crime and education.

Now they are bellyaching over a leaked Supreme Court document that could mean Roe v. Wade might be overturned by conservative Supreme Court Justices appointed by Republican presidents.

Is there any greater evidence than this that elections matter? Democrats can keep their heads in the sand, thinking their way is the right way, ignoring the polls, as they feign outrage over Roe v. Wade, hoping it’s a lifeline. But polls represent people, and people vote.

BECKY SMITH, ROSWELL

SCOTUS free to interpret Constitution; we’re free to protest peacefully

Speculation about the possibility of the Supreme Court overturning Roe vs. Wade got me thinking. What is our Constitution, really?

On some level, I thought it was a hard set of rules, perhaps like the Ten Commandments. But I’ve come to realize it is not. It’s whatever SCOTUS says it is, and they change their minds from time to time.

Now it appears the court may be preparing to change its mind on the constitutionality of abortion.

The Constitution is a living document. It should be perceived as a broad set of guidelines by which we, the people, wish to live and it should be interpreted in light of our current mores and ethics and other influencing factors.

Yes, shouting “Fire!” in a crowded theater is free speech, but it is not protected by the Constitution.

Hopefully, the SCOTUS justices are wise, thoughtful and unbiased people. We may not always agree with their decisions, but we are free to openly protest – peacefully – against them and perhaps change their thinking on future issues.

GREG BERRY, MARIETTA