Readers write

ajc.com

Credit: pskinner@ajc.com

Credit: pskinner@ajc.com

Commonsense gun control laws will save lives

I read the opinion piece entitled “Gun problem a spiritual, cultural, family one” (Insights, May 31). The author posed 12 questions with the premise that gun violence is rooted in “America’s broken core” and that gun control laws will not prevent mass shootings.

A few questions came to mind that I would pose to the author. They assume that there is a 17-year-old man with violent tendencies living close to his grandchildren’s home.

1.) Should that man be able to purchase an AK-style rifle on his 18th birthday?

2.) Should a background check be completed before the purchase?

3.) Should there be a 7-day waiting period before the weapon is picked up?

4.) Should there be a way to confiscate the gun if it is found that the man is a danger to himself and others?

“Commonsense” gun control laws will save lives. Let’s pass some of those since we are light years away from fixing “America’s broken core!”

MICHAEL SHIELDS, HOSCHTON

Expand Medicaid to cover outpatient dialysis, save lives

End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a debilitating condition. Patients with ESRD have no remaining kidney function and must obtain dialysis thrice weekly for the remainder of their life to avoid deadly toxin build-up. Unfortunately, uninsured patients must either self-pay $72,000 annually for regular dialysis or forgo care until they require hospitalization for emergency dialysis.

No population faces more barriers to obtaining regular dialysis than undocumented immigrants, who are ineligible for most insurance in Georgia. Relying on emergency-only dialysis, these individuals face a mortality risk 14 times higher than those receiving regular dialysis. This costs hospitals nearly $300,000 annually per patient in charity care.

As 12 states have already done, the solution is clear. Georgia must expand the scope of emergency Medicaid to cover outpatient dialysis for these patients. With this change, dialysis would be recognized as life-sustaining treatment, preventing thousands of deaths and saving millions of dollars annually.

STEPHEN GURLEY, M.D., M.P.H.; ALYSSA GREENHOUSE, M.D., M.P.H., ATLANTA, RECENT GRADUATES, EMORY UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE