Readers write

Biden keeps wasting taxpayer money on proxy war with Russia

The Biden administration has wasted $9 billion of our taxes on a bloody war that has not one thing to do with U.S. security. And the Republicans are in lockstep with this waste of our taxes.

This money spent on a proxy war with Russia is an ethical assault on our humanity, using the bodies of Ukraine to fight and kill Russians. I’m stunned that Russia has not retaliated against the U.S. for funding and supplying a war that is killing their people. Where is the American outrage in extending a proxy war that could ignite WWIII?

FREDDIE G. MONROE, SNELLVILLE

Trump supporters must think former president is above the law

Predictably, Republicans are whining and screaming about the recent FBI search of Mara Lago.

Of course, they are not bothered by Trump’s illegal removal of documents ( some classified ) from the White House. They are not troubled by his fomenting the violent attack on the Capitol on Jan. 6. His attempts to convince former Vice President Pence to ignore the will of the voters and delay or reverse the 2020 election do not seem to be a problem for them. His apparent disregard for Pence’s life when the rioters yelled “Hang Pence” did not present an issue. His recorded phone call to the Georgia secretary of state to “find 11,000+ votes” for him was OK, I guess.

I believe Republicans think that some people are above the law. They believe Trump is above the law.

LARRY J. PETT, ATLANTA

Well-invested communities are the safest and healthiest

We are physicians working in Atlanta and are writing on behalf of hundreds of local healthcare workers to express our disgust at the City Council and Mayor Dickens’ ongoing attempts to renege on promises to close the nearly-empty Atlanta City Detention Center.

The failure to invest in communities continues to contribute to preventable suffering and premature death. We know that policing and incarceration does not lead to safety and frequently exacerbate the desperation and poverty that often leads to legal involvement. It is well-resourced and invested-in communities that are the safest and healthiest. We reject any expansion of the carceral footprint in Atlanta, including a lease or the building of a new jail. Our city’s addiction to punishment, seen in the ongoing criminalization of poverty, mental health, and substance use, makes it nearly impossible for many patients to live happy, healthy lives. We must urgently redefine what constitutes public safety.

MARK SPENCER, MD, INTERNAL MEDICINE RESIDENT PHYSICIAN, ATLANTA

VANESSA VAN DOREN, MD, INFECTIOUS DISEASES FELLOW PHYSICIAN, ATLANTA

Having Medicare negotiate drug prices saves recipients and taxpayers

My daughter lives with intellectual disabilities and intractable epilepsy. She is 1 of 300 people in the world diagnosed with a rare neurological disorder causing clusters of seizures, nearly 50 within an hour. The medications that keep her alive average $50,000 a month. We could not afford that without Medicare.

We’re the lucky ones. For decades, many seniors and Americans with disabilities have had to pay exorbitant prescription drug costs because Medicare was barred from negotiating with drug companies.

But this week, that finally changed. Democrats in Congress passed a bill that finally enables Medicare to negotiate drug prices and caps out-of-pocket spending. This bill not only saves Medicare recipients but also saves taxpayers hundreds of billions over the next decade. I shouldn’t feel grateful that our government is finally listening to what Americans have been pleading for decades, but thankfully one party is actually working for the American people.

CONNIE GRADY, LAWRENCEVILLE