U.N. General Assembly approves Syria resolution


DEVELOPMENTS

— A senior Israeli official signaled Wednesday that Israel was considering further military strikes on Syria to stop the transfer of advanced weapons to Islamic militants, and he warned the Syrian president, Bashar Assad, that his government would face crippling consequences if it retaliated against Israel.

— Rebel fighters battled regime troops inside the walls of the sprawling central prison compound in Syria’s largest city Wednesday, hours after blowing open the gate with twin car bombs in an attempted jailbreak, activists said. The orchestrated assault began at dawn, but by nightfall, the rebels had not dislodged regime forces or freed some 4,000 prisoners held there, according to two pro-opposition monitoring groups.

— Across Syria, the Internet was restored after a blackout of more than eight hours, the second nationwide outage in a week. Syria’s Communications Ministry blamed a rebel bombing that it said cut a cable north of the capital of Damascus but gave no details. Earlier, the state news agency SANA had linked the outage to a technical problem.

— Associated Press

The U.N. General Assembly approved an Arab-backed resolution Wednesday calling for a political transition in Syria, but more than 70 countries refused to vote “yes” because of its support for the main opposition group and fears the resolution could torpedo a new U.S.-Russia effort to end the escalating conflict.

The United States signed on as a co-sponsor of the resolution, saying it would promote a political solution. But key Syrian ally Russia urged a “no” vote, saying it was “counterproductive and irresponsible” to promote a one-sided resolution when Moscow and Washington are trying to get the Syrian government and opposition to agree to negotiations.

The resolution, which is not legally binding though it can carry moral weight, was approved by a vote of 107-12 with 59 abstentions.

It welcomes the establishment of the Syrian National Coalition, the main opposition group, “as effective interlocutors needed for a political transition” and notes “wide international acknowledgment” that the group is the legitimate representative of the Syrian people. It also strongly condemns President Bashar Assad’s regime for its escalating use of heavy weapons and “gross violations” of human rights.

The Arab group decided to seek approval of a wide-ranging resolution on Syria in the General Assembly, where there are no vetoes, to reflect international dismay at the increasing death toll, now more than 70,000, and the failure to end the more than 2-year-old conflict.

Unlike Security Council resolutions, which are legally binding, General Assembly resolutions cannot be enforced. But approval of an assembly resolution would counter the paralysis of the deeply divided Security Council, where Syria’s allies, Russia and China, have vetoed three Western-backed resolutions aimed at pressuring Assad to end the violence.

General Assembly President Vuk Jeremic told the 193-member world body that “what happens in Syria in the weeks and months ahead will profoundly bear upon the security and well-being of the entire region, and possibly beyond.”

Jeremic warned, “If we are unable to do anything to stop this tragedy, then how can we sustain the moral credibility of this organization?”

U.S. deputy ambassador Rosemary DiCarlo told members before the vote that Syria faces a severe humanitarian crisis, with more than 1.4 million people fleeing the country and 4.25 million displaced inside it.

“It is clear that we need a Syrian-led peaceful political transition,” she said, explaining that this is what spurred the U.S.-Russian initiative, announced May 7.

“Adopting this resolution will send a clear message that the political solution we all seek is the best way to end the suffering of the people of Syria,” DiCarlo said.

Russia’s deputy U.N. ambassador Alexander Pankin sharply disagreed, calling the resolution “very harmful and destructive” and accusing its Arab sponsors of using it as a way to replace the Syrian government — not to find a political solution to the crisis.

Pankin strongly criticized the resolution for disregarding “illegal actions of the armed opposition” and blaming the worsening human rights situation entirely on the Syrian government.

Syria’s U.N. Ambassador Bashar Ja’afari said the resolution “seeks to escalate the crisis and fuel violence in Syria’ by legitimizing the provision of weapons to the opposition and illegally recognizing a single faction of the opposition as the legitimate representative of the Syrian people.