‘12 Years’ and ‘Hustle’ top a varied Globes field


TOP NOMINEES

Motion pictures

• Picture, drama: “12 Years a Slave,” ”Captain Phillips,” ”Gravity,” ”Philomena,” ”Rush”

•Picture, musical or comedy: “American Hustle,” ”Her,” ”Inside Llewyn Davis,” ”Nebraska,” ”The Wolf of Wall Street

• Actor, drama: Chiwetel Ejiofor, “12 Years a Slave”; Idris Elba, “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom”; Tom Hanks, “Captain Phillips”; Matthew McConaughey, “Dallas Buyers Club”; Robert Redford, “All Is Lost”

• Actress, drama: Cate Blanchett, “Blue Jasmine”; Sandra Bullock, “Gravity”; Judi Dench, “Philomena”; Emma Thompson, “Saving Mr. Banks”; Kate Winslet, “Labor Day”

• Director: Alfonso Cuaron, “Gravity”; Paul Greengrass, “Captain Phillips”; Steve McQueen, “12 Years a Slave”; Alexander Payne, “Nebraska”; David O. Russell, “American Hustle”

• Actor, musical or comedy: Christian Bale, “American Hustle”; Bruce Dern, “Nebraska”; Leonardo DiCaprio, “The Wolf of Wall Street”; Oscar Isaac, “Inside Llewyn Davis”; Joaquin Phoenix, “Her”

•Actress, musical or comedy: Amy Adams, “American Hustle”; Julie Delpy, “Before Midnight”; Greta Gerwig, “Frances Ha”; Julia Louis-Dreyfus, “Enough Said”; Meryl Streep, “August: Osage County”

Supporting actor: Barkhad Abdi, “Captain Phillips”; Daniel Bruhl, “Rush”; Bradley Cooper, “American Hustle”; Michael Fassbender, “12 Years a Slave”; Jared Leto, “Dallas Buyers Club”

Supporting actress: Sally Hawkins, “Blue Jasmine”; Jennifer Lawrence, “American Hustle”; Lupita Nyong’o, “12 Years a Slave”; Julia Roberts, “August: Osage County”; June Squibb, “Nebraska”

Television

•Series, drama: “Breaking Bad,” “Downton Abbey,” “The Good Wife,” “House of Cards,” “Masters of Sex”

•Actor, drama: Bryan Cranston, “Breaking Bad”; Liev Schreiber, “Ray Donovan”; Michael Sheen, “Masters of Sex”; Kevin Spacey, “House of Cards”

•Actress, drama: Julianna Margulies, “The Good Wife”; Tatiana Maslany, “Orphan Black”; Taylor Schilling, “Orange Is the New Black”; Kerry Washington, “Scandal”; Robin Wright, “House of Cards”

•Series, musical or comedy: “The Big Bang Theory,” “Brooklyn Nine-Nine,” “Girls,” ”Modern Family,” “Parks and Recreation”

•Actor, musical or comedy: Jason Bateman, “Arrested Development”; Don Cheadle, “House of Lies”; Michael J. Fox, “The Michael J. Fox Show”; Jim Parsons, “The Big Bang Theory”; Andy Samberg, “Brooklyn Nine-Nine”

•Actress, musical or comedy: Zooey Deschanel, “New Girl”; Lena Dunham, “Girls”; Edie Falco, “Nurse Jackie”; Julia Louis-Dreyfus, “Veep”; Amy Poehler, “Parks and Recreation”

Heaping seven nominations on both the con-artist melodrama “American Hustle” and the grimly historical “12 Years a Slave,” the Golden Globes nominations set up a showdown of contrasts: comedy and drama, light and dark, white and black.

The two films were validated as Academy Awards front-runners in the Globes nominations announced Thursday in Beverly Hills, Calif., by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, refining what had been a scattered awards season in a year many consider encouragingly plentiful of worthy movies.

The differences between the two top-nominees are vast. While David O. Russell’s fictionalized caper “American Hustle” takes a playful, exaggerated approach to an already outlandish story (the FBI’s scandal-uncovering Abscam investigation in the disco 1970s), Steve McQueen’s “12 Years a Slave,” based on Solomon Northup’s 1853 memoir, is unflinching in its portrait of Southern slavery — a subject Hollywood has seldom depicted rigorously or truthfully.

“I feel this film is pivotal and just good for the world,” said Lupita Nyong’o, who was nominated for best supporting actress. The other nominations for “12 Years a Slave” include best picture, drama; best actor for Chiwetel Ejiofor; best director for McQueen; and best supporting actor for Michael Fassbender.

“American Hustle,” though equally dramatic as it is comedic, is for Russell a closely felt story of self-renewal. Reteaming much of the casts from his past two acclaimed films (“Silver Linings Playbook” and “The Fighter”), the movie’s warm reception completes a personal redemption for the director.

“There is not a molecule in my body that isn’t humbly grateful,” Russell said. “From the second we made ‘The Fighter,’ it’s been a journey that began from a low point for me to a new period that I feel my life was leading up to.”

“American Hustle” received nominations for best picture, comedy; Russell for best director; Christian Bale for best actor, comedy; Amy Adams for best actress, comedy; and Jennifer Lawrence, last year’s Oscar darling, for best supporting actress.

This year’s comedy competition — usually a mixed bag compared to the dramatic categories — could be the strongest field ever for the Globes (even if many don’t neatly slide under the label of “comedy” or “musical”). Aside from “American Hustle,” the group includes “The Wolf of Wall Street,” ”Nebraska,” ”Her” and “Inside Llewyn Davis.”

Two 77-year-old veterans landed best actor nominations: Robert Redford in the drama “All Is Lost,” and Bruce Dern in the comedy “Nebraska.” Redford, who hasn’t ever won an acting Oscar, gives a nearly unspoken performance as a man shipwrecked in the Indian Ocean in “All Is Lost.”

“The only other time that the Golden Globes came into my life was in 1964,” said Redford. “I think the organization was only about a year old, but I was voted Star of Tomorrow in 1964. So it’s been awhile.”

Though the Globes are known for their idiosyncratic choices (last year “Salmon Fishing in the Yemen” received three curious nominations), their 2013 picks contained few oddities.

The most notable shutout was “Lee Daniels’ The Butler,” the civil rights history told through a long-serving White House butler played by Forest Whitaker. Oprah Winfrey has been considered a favorite among supporting actresses. Also denied were hopefuls “Fruitvale Station” and “Prisoners.”