The death of Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Randall Smith occurred two days after a deadly shooting killed four Marines and injured three others, including the sailor, in Chattanooga.

Sailor shot in Chattanooga rampage dies, brings toll to 5

The death of Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Randall Smith, a reservist serving on active duty in Chattanooga, occurred two days after a deadly shooting killed four Marines and injured three others, including the sailor, in Chattanooga, according to The Associated Press.

As the nation mourned the Marines, Smith, a logistics specialist in the U.S. Navy, clung to life in a hospital for two days. He died early Saturday.

Smith, 26, grew up in the northwest Ohio city of Paulding. Gov. Nathan Deal’s office sent a tweet Saturday afternoon offering their condolences for the Navy Officer who live in Walker County, near the Tennessee state line.

The petty officer 2nd class sailor got a baseball scholarship to play at nearby Defiance College after high school, according to his step-grandmother Darlene Proxmire. But after being sidelined by a shoulder injury, he decided to join the Navy.

He got married a few months after signing up, and had three young daughters.

"He loved his family, baseball and the Navy," Proxmire said.

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Grandmother Linda Wallace said before his death she was upset to learn that there was little security outside the Marine-Navy center.

"I cannot believe our soldiers do not have guns there," she said. "A lot of people are learning our bases aren't guarded."

Wallace she never worried about her grandson serving in the military because he'd always been stationed in the U.S. He was in Norfolk, Virginia, before transferring to Chattanooga.

She said Thursday she was flying on Friday to be with her daughter and her grandson in Chattanooga.

Wallace last saw her grandson on Mother's Day weekend when he made a surprise visit to her home along with his mother and aunt.

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