Muslims in America decry 'horrific' acts in Paris

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The American Muslim community has spoken out against the attacks in Paris that killed more than 120 people.

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The Islamic State, also known as ISIS, has claimed responsibility for the attacks, which occurred at multiple sites including restaurants and a concert hall.

Here's what people are saying across the U.S.:

Georgia

Dr. Naseer A. Humayun, a spokesman for the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community Georgia Chapter has called the attacks "horrific acts."

“We strongly condem them,” he said. “These people are terrorists and should be considered as such. No religion condones violence, especially Islam. These people are using the name of Islam for their own political agenda.”

The Georgia chapter has about 400 members.

Those thoughts were echoed throughout the state’s Muslim communities.

Soumaya Khalifa, CEO of Khalifa Consulting and executive director of the Islamic Speakers Bureau of Atlanta, took to social media after she learned of the attacks in Paris. The organization builds interfaith relations and provides information about Islam and American Muslims.

“#istandwithparis,” she posted on her Facebook page.

Khalifa said the organization plans to open the event with a prayer for Paris and other tragedies, including the recent bombings in Beirut in which more than 40 people died.

Massachusetts

This statement was released by Yusufi Vali, the executive director of the Islamic Society of Boston Cultural Center:

"As you can imagine, Boston's hearts and prayers have been with Paris since last night. The tragedy is simply horrific and heartbreaking."

"Our hearts and prayers are with those in Paris. May God shower Hist mercy on those who passed, heal those who are wounded and bring his justice to the perpetrators of this horrific act," the group wrote on their Facebook page.

Our hearts and prayers are with those in Paris. May Allah have mercy on those who passed, heal those who are wounded and bring his justice to the perpetrators of this horrific act.

Posted by Islamic Society of Boston Cultural Center (ISBCC) on Friday, November 13, 2015

Other individuals have posted their condolences on social media.

Tennessee

Dr. Yasir Qadhi - Islamic theologian, scholar, religious advisor and Dean of Academic Affairs at AlMaghrib Institute

California

Hamza Yusuf - President and co-founder of Zaytuna College

Texas

Omar Suleiman - Instructor and Head of the History Dept. at Bayyinah Institute, Director of the Islamic Learning Foundation

New York

Khalid Latif - Executive Director of Islamic Center at NYU

Note: The Empire State Building went dark at 10:00 PM/ET on Friday in sympathy for Paris. The photo that shows the building with colors in the French flag is from January, when the colors were changed in solidarity after the attack on the "Charlie Hebdo" offices.