Jurors: Greed corrupted abortion doctor

Jurors who convicted him this week of killing three babies born alive at his run-down West Philadelphia clinic thought he began his career with good intentions, but then lost his way.

“He started out as a good, practicing doctor. But eventually, it just became a money-generating machine,” juror Joseph Carroll said Wednesday, after Gosnell was sentenced to a third life term for killing an aborted baby he described as so big it could walk to the bus. “Most of us felt it probably came down to a greed factor.”

Gosnell, 72, was given two life sentences Tuesday in a deal that spared him a potential death sentence, and the third sentence was handed down Wednesday for the baby known as “Baby A.” That boy’s teen mother had been nearly 30 weeks pregnant, prosecution witnesses estimated. Stunned clinic workers took cellphone photos of the baby boy, photos that provided key evidence for the murder charge.

Gosnell received another 2 ½ to five years in prison for the 2009 overdose death of a patient who died after firefighters spent more an hour trying to get the comatose woman’s stretcher through the byzantine clinic and out a padlocked side door. He is not eligible for parole, and will die in prison.

The case has made Gosnell a flashpoint in the nation’s bitter debate over legalized abortion.

Gosnell had been the rare black student from his working-class neighborhood to go to medical school. He became an early proponent of therapeutic abortions in the 1960s and ’70s, and returned from a stint in New York City to open up a clinic in the impoverished Mantua neighborhood, near where he had grown up as the only child of a gas station operator and government clerk.

His Women’s Medical Center treated the poor, immigrants and teens, offering free basic medical care to elderly people, many of whom were seen in recent years by unlicensed doctor Eileen O’Neill.

But Gosnell made millions performing abortions, charging up to $2,500 or more in cash if women were in their second or third trimester. District Attorney R. Seth Williams said Wednesday that Gosnell put women through labor, then killed their babies, “because it’s cheaper to do that.”

Former staffers testified that Gosnell once performed mostly first-term procedures, perhaps 20 a night, along with a few later-term procedures. But that ratio reversed itself from 2000 to 2010, as Gosnell increasingly attracted desperate women who were further along.

According to prosecutors, he routinely performed abortions after the 20-week limit in Delaware, where he also worked, and the 24-week limit in Pennsylvania. And he did the late-term surgical procedures in his clinic, while they were more typically done in hospitals.

Gosnell by then was also attracting lawsuits from women who said they were injured during botched abortions at his clinic. One woman said he left fetal remains inside her, and another sued over a perforated uterus.

Workers testified that the West Philadelphia clinic deteriorated over the decade they worked there, as Gosnell cut costs by reusing disposable medical equipment that spread venereal disease, and relied on unlicensed doctors and untrained staff to perform skilled medical care. The jury found that contributed to the overdose death of a 41-year-old patient who was sedated repeatedly by medical assistants.

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