McDonald’s latest company to be hit by data breach

Caption
A brief history of McDonald's. McDonald's was founded by brothers Maurice and Richard McDonald in California in 1940. Ray Kroc discovered the restaurant in 1954 and franchised it. In 1961, Kroc bought the rights to the McDonald’s brother's company for $2.7 million. The Big Mac was added to the national menu in 1968. The Egg McMuffin was added to the national menu in 1975. Chicken McNuggets were introduced to all U.S. restaurants in 1983. In 1984, Ray Kroc died, having worked for the company until his passing. The company has over 36,000 restaurants in over 100 countries

McDonald’s has become the latest company to be hit by a data breach after unauthorized activity on its network exposed the personal data of some customers in South Korea and Taiwan.

McDonald's Corp. said Friday that it quickly identified and contained the incident and that a thorough investigation was done.

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“While we were able to close off access quickly after identification, our investigation has determined that a small number of files were accessed, some of which contained personal data," the burger chain said.

McDonald's said its investigation determined that only South Korea and Taiwan had customer personal data accessed, and that they would be taking steps to notify regulators and also the customers who may be impacted. No customer payment information was exposed.

McDonald's said it will look at the investigation's findings, coupled with input from security resources, to identify ways to further enhance its existing security measures.

ExploreMeat company JBS confirms it paid $11M ransom in cyberattack

Businesses across various sectors are being targeted by cybercriminals, including some very high profile cases in recent weeks. On Wednesday, JBS SA, the world’s largest meat processing company, revealed that it had paid the equivalent of $11 million to hackers who broke into its computer system last month.

And Colonial Pipeline, which transports about half of the fuel consumed on the East Coast, last month paid a ransom of 75 bitcoin — then valued at roughly $4.4 million — in hopes of getting its system back online. On Monday the Justice Department announced that it had recovered most of the ransom payment.