China hails Xi and Biden talks, after year of growing strain

In this photo released by Xinhua News Agency, Chinese President Xi Jinping, right, and President Joe Biden appear on a screen as they hold a meeting via video link. Biden opened the virtual meeting by saying the goal of the two world leaders should be to ensure that competition between the two superpowers "does not veer into conflict." (Yue Yuewei/Xinhua via AP)
Caption
In this photo released by Xinhua News Agency, Chinese President Xi Jinping, right, and President Joe Biden appear on a screen as they hold a meeting via video link. Biden opened the virtual meeting by saying the goal of the two world leaders should be to ensure that competition between the two superpowers "does not veer into conflict." (Yue Yuewei/Xinhua via AP)

Credit: Yue Yuewei

Credit: Yue Yuewei

BEIJING — China on Tuesday hailed a virtual meeting between President Xi Jinping and President Joe Biden, saying they had a candid and constructive exchange that sent a strong signal to the world.

The positive description of the meeting came in sharp contrast to heated exchanges between the two nations earlier this year. The talks appeared to mark what both sides hoped would be a turnaround in relations, though major differences remain.

Caption
President Joe Biden listens as he meets virtually with Chinese President Xi Jinping. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Credit: Susan Walsh

President Joe Biden listens as he meets virtually with Chinese President Xi Jinping. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
Caption
President Joe Biden listens as he meets virtually with Chinese President Xi Jinping. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Credit: Susan Walsh

Credit: Susan Walsh

“If China-U.S. relations cannot return to the past, they should face the future,” Foreign Ministry spokesperson Zhao Lijian said.

The video conference between the two leaders and their senior aides lasted more than three hours and was their first formal meeting since Biden took office in January.

ExplorePrevious coverage: Biden raises human rights, trade in first call with China’s Xi

Facing domestic pressures at home, both Biden and Xi seemed determined to lower the temperature in what for both sides is their most significant — and frequently turbulent — relationship on the global stage.

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President Joe Biden speaks as he meets virtually with Chinese President Xi Jinping from the Roosevelt Room of the White House. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Credit: Susan Walsh

President Joe Biden speaks as he meets virtually with Chinese President Xi Jinping from the Roosevelt Room of the White House. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
Caption
President Joe Biden speaks as he meets virtually with Chinese President Xi Jinping from the Roosevelt Room of the White House. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Credit: Susan Walsh

Credit: Susan Walsh

“As I’ve said before, it seems to me our responsibility as leaders of China and the United States is to ensure that the competition between our countries does not veer into conflict, whether intended or unintended,” Biden told Xi at the start of their virtual meeting Monday. “Just simple, straightforward competition.”

The White House set low expectations for the meeting, and no major announcements or even a joint statement were delivered. Still, White House officials said the two leaders had a substantive exchange.

Xi greeted the U.S. president as his “old friend” and echoed Biden’s cordial tone in his own opening remarks, saying, “China and the United States need to increase communication and cooperation.”

However, Xi held a tough line on Taiwan, which Chinese officials had signaled would be a top issue for them at the talks. Tensions have heightened as the Chinese military has dispatched an increasing number of fighter jets near the self-ruled island, which Beijing considers part of its territory.

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Secretary of State Antony Blinken listens as President Joe Biden meets virtually with Chinese President Xi Jinping from the Roosevelt Room of the White House. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Credit: Susan Walsh

Secretary of State Antony Blinken listens as President Joe Biden meets virtually with Chinese President Xi Jinping from the Roosevelt Room of the White House. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
Caption
Secretary of State Antony Blinken listens as President Joe Biden meets virtually with Chinese President Xi Jinping from the Roosevelt Room of the White House. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Credit: Susan Walsh

Credit: Susan Walsh

Xi blamed the tensions on Taiwan seeking to attain independence through reliance on the U.S. and some on the American side using Taiwan as a way to interfere in China, the official Xinhua News Agency said.

“This is extremely dangerous, it’s playing with fire, and they that play with fire will burn themselves,” Xi was quoted as saying by the agency.

Chinese military forces held exercises last week near Taiwan in response to a visit by a U.S. congressional delegation to the island.

The White House said Biden reiterated the U.S. will abide by the longstanding U.S. “One China” policy, which recognizes Beijing but allows informal relations and defense ties with Taipei. But Biden also made clear the U.S. “strongly opposes unilateral efforts to change the status quo or undermine peace and stability across the Taiwan Strait,” the White House said.

The relationship has had no shortage of tension since Biden strode into the White House in January and quickly criticized Beijing for human rights abuses against Uyghurs in northwest China, suppression of democratic protests in Hong Kong, military aggression against the self-ruled island of Taiwan and more. Xi’s deputies, meanwhile, have lashed out against the Biden White House for interfering in what they see as internal Chinese matters.

The White House in a statement said Biden again raised concerns about China’s human rights practices, and Biden made clear that he sought to “protect American workers and industries from the PRC’s unfair trade and economic practices.” The two also spoke about key regional challenges, including North Korea, Afghanistan and Iran.

As U.S.-China tensions have mounted, both leaders also have found themselves under the weight of increased challenges in their own backyards.

Biden, who has watched his poll numbers diminish amid concerns about the lingering coronavirus pandemic, inflation and supply chain problems, was looking to find a measure of equilibrium on the most consequential foreign policy matter he faces.

Xi, meanwhile, is facing a COVID-19 resurgence, rampant energy shortages and a looming housing crisis that Biden officials worry could cause tremors in the global market.

“Right now, both China and the United States are at critical stages of development, and humanity lives in a global village, and we face multiple challenges together,” Xi said.

The U.S. president was joined in the Roosevelt Room for the video call by Secretary of State Antony Blinken and a handful of aides. Xi, for his part, was accompanied in the East Hall of the Great Hall of the People by communist party director Ding Xuexiang and a number of advisers.

The high-level diplomacy had a touch of pandemic Zoom meeting informality as the two leaders waved to each other once they saw one another on the screen, with Xi telling Biden, “It’s the first time for us to meet virtually, although it’s not as good as a face-to-face meeting.”

Biden would have preferred to meet Xi in person, but the Chinese leader has not left his country since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. The White House floated the idea of a virtual meeting as the next best thing to allow for the two leaders to have a candid conversation about a wide range of strains in the relationship.