Soon-to-reopen Big Chicken teases a short film about the famous fowl

Marlon Ramirez operates the lift that keeps him positioned to paint on the side of the Big Chicken in Marietta, Georgia, on March 22, 2017. The local landmark that has been used for directions for decades is going under the first serious renovation in years.
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Marlon Ramirez operates the lift that keeps him positioned to paint on the side of the Big Chicken in Marietta, Georgia, on March 22, 2017. The local landmark that has been used for directions for decades is going under the first serious renovation in years.

Credit: Henry P. Taylor

Credit: Henry P. Taylor

The Big Chicken is up to something.

You probably already know that it'll be hatching this week after a four-month remodeling, but the iconic avian eatery has teased that it'll be dropping a short film sometime soon.

The heads-up came in the form of a Facebook post that reads: "The Big Chicken's grand reopening is on May 11. In honor of the day, we made a short film. Coming soon to a screen near you."

There'd be a lot to talk about because much has happened since the 56-foot-tall animatronic chicken first came out of its shell in 1963.

It was designed by Georgia Tech architectural student Hubert Puckett for what was at that site — Johnny Reb's Chick, Chuck and Shake.

KFC took over in 1974 and considered tearing down the bird structure in 1993 after high winds damaged it.

The renovation of 12 Cobb Parkway was announced in January as part of a larger effort to freshen up the other 50 or so KFCs owned by KBP Foods.

The company said to expect a wall of Big Chicken history as part of the overhaul.

It isn’t clear from the Facebook post if the film will be premiered at the Thursday grand opening event.

Until then, you can watch this interesting video of the walking Big Chicken mascot or a video below showing crews repainting the chicken structure.

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To Davey Vining of Venture Construction, this project is much more than just another business transaction, as he's been given the opportunity to give back to the community and help a construct that helped shape his childhood.

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