For teen drivers, police in N. Fulton hosting a free safety class

The Milton Police Department wants its drivers to be safe, especially the rookie ones.

With today’s technology, it’s easy to be distracted as a driver. Milton’s Police Department is trying to be proactive and get to its young drivers before they settle into bad habits.

Under the P.R.I.D.E. (Parents Reducing Injuries and Driver Error) curriculum, Milton police are offering its teen residents a free driver safety course. The next date is July 18, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Milton Municipal Court.

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The free two-hour session covers driving safety for both parents and teens, and it provides info on what parents need to know about the 40 hours of required supervised driving time. It also teaches students about Georgia’s driving laws, includes a Q&A session and provides parents with a take-home packet.

Although this course targets ages 14 to 16, teens of any age may attend with a parent or guardian. Registration is required to attend.

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Milton police say that this program addresses the driver’s attitude, knowledge and behavior, rather than technical hands-on driver training course. It focuses on seat belts, crash dynamics, laws, parental influence and peer pressure. It is not a replacement for driver’s education courses.

For more info on the course or to register, visit Milton’s website.

Another course is available on Aug. 29.

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