In their own words: The great divide between red and blue counties

Georgia’s political divide is stark. After the voting stopped for the 2020 election, Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporters asked voters in “red” and “blue” counties to explain why they voted the way they did.
Georgia’s political divide is stark. After the voting stopped for the 2020 election, Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporters asked voters in “red” and “blue” counties to explain why they voted the way they did.

Credit: AJC staff photos

Credit: AJC staff photos

Urban DeKalb, rural Jasper voters voice sharply different views

It’s been more than a week since Georgia stopped voting.

Some are still questioning who won the state, with Democratic challenger Joe Biden only enjoying a razor-thin margin of victory over President Donald Trump.

Many Republicans can’t understand how roughly half of Georgia voted for Biden. Many Democrats can’t understand how roughly half of Georgia voted for Trump. To avoid arguments, many also have stopped talking with each other.

The state’s political lines are stark. Biden easily won many urban counties, while many rural, lightly populated counties strongly backed Trump. Trump also carried many counties with majority white voters, while counties with many Black voters went for Biden.

After the voting stopped, Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporters asked voters in “red” Jasper County and “blue” DeKalb County to explain why they voted like they did.

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