New photos released weeks after baby found in plastic bag in Georgia woods

While she has not been identified, hospital workers decided to call the baby India, rather than the standard baby Jane Doe.
While she has not been identified, hospital workers decided to call the baby India, rather than the standard baby Jane Doe.

Credit: Forsyth County Sheriff's Office

Credit: Forsyth County Sheriff's Office

More than two weeks after a baby was found abandoned in a wooded area in Forsyth County, new photos of the girl were released Friday and sheriff’s officials renewed calls for leads in the case.

Authorities still have not tracked down the child’s parents.

“If anyone has any information related to this case or knows of a female who was in the late stages of pregnancy and may have given birth to this infant, please contact Detective. T. Conner” at 770-781-2222, ext. 5920, the sheriff’s office said in an alert. “You may also call the tip line at 770-888-7308.”

The baby, known as India, was found the night of June 6 in a plastic bag in a wooded area in Forsyth County.
The baby, known as India, was found the night of June 6 in a plastic bag in a wooded area in Forsyth County.

Credit: Forsyth County Sheriff's Office

Credit: Forsyth County Sheriff's Office

Homeowner Alan Ragetz found the baby the night of June 6, shortly after his family returned from a trip. As they were unpacking their bags, a child heard what sounded like a baby crying, Forsyth County Sheriff Ron Freeman said shortly after the child was located. They called 911.

The baby was discovered in a plastic shopping bag on an isolated stretch of Daves Creek Road in the southern part of the county.

While she has not been identified, hospital workers decided to call the baby India, rather than the standard baby Jane Doe. Freeman said he thought the temporary name was fitting.

The Forysth County Sheriff's Office said deputies performed first aid on the infant and rushed her to the hospital. She was listed as stable.

A representative with the Georgia Division of Family and Children Services is acting as the child’s advocate.

Georgia has a “safe haven” law for babies like India, which allows unwanted babies to be dropped off at medical facilities or with public safety agencies without fear of prosecution.

“Georgia (law) provides you've got 30 days to do that, not to leave a baby in the woods,” Freeman said.