Alpharetta looks to slow speeding traffic

Near downtown, Alpharetta sought to reduce the speed limit by 10 mph to an allowable speed of 25 mph on parts of Main Street, Cumming Street, Lakeview Parkway, Mayfield Road and Milton Avenue. Contributed by Alpharetta Convention & Visitors Bureau

Credit: LAUREN_LIZ_KRESS

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Near downtown, Alpharetta sought to reduce the speed limit by 10 mph to an allowable speed of 25 mph on parts of Main Street, Cumming Street, Lakeview Parkway, Mayfield Road and Milton Avenue. Contributed by Alpharetta Convention & Visitors Bureau

Credit: LAUREN_LIZ_KRESS

Credit: LAUREN_LIZ_KRESS

Alpharetta will use traffic calming measures on several streets instead of reducing the speed limit, for now.

A traffic study found 85% of vehicles on city streets including the downtown area were traveling more than 10 miles per hour over the speed limit, according to the Public Works department. But the Georgia Department of Transportation denied a city request to lower the speed limit on more than 160 roadways.

During a Monday City Council meeting, Public Works Director Pete Sewczwicz said GDOT recommends that Alpharetta first try such traffic calming measures as electronic speed detection signs on roadsides to encourage lower driving speeds.

Near downtown, Alpharetta sought to reduce the speed limit by 10 mph to an allowable speed of 25 mph on parts of Main Street, Cumming Street, Lakeview Parkway, Mayfield Road and Milton Avenue. And suggested lowering the speed limit 15 mph on Maxwell Road between Main Street and Brady Place, due to narrow 9-foot lanes.

On Tuesday, Assistant City Administrator James Drinkard told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution that the city could try altering landscape along roadways by adding visual elements to make corridors appear narrow.

“It makes the driver feel a little more constricted and they tend to slow their speeds,” Drinkard said.

No actions have been decided on yet, he added. According to the Public Works department, another traffic study will be considered in the fall.

Drinkard has said speed limit changes are discussed periodically by city officials as new building developments arise and residents’ activities change.

A full list streets where officials want to see vehicles traveling at reduced speeds is located on the city website at alpharetta.ga.us.

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