5-way roundabout on Moreland designed to help freight traffic

This is a rendering of a planned five-way roundabout that's poised to come to southeast Atlanta.

Credit: Metro South Community Improvement District

Combined ShapeCaption
This is a rendering of a planned five-way roundabout that's poised to come to southeast Atlanta.

Credit: Metro South Community Improvement District

A troubled intersection in southeast Atlanta is getting a makeover due to the increasing number of large trucks and tractor-trailers that pass through the area.

The Metro South Community Improvement District (CID) announced plans for a five-way roundabout where Moreland Avenue meets Bailey Street in unincorporated DeKalb County. The corridor, which is home to multiple logistics and freight shipping facilities, has been identified as a problem area by the CID due to the increasing truck traffic.

“This project will correct numerous deficiencies on the corridor, such as the five-legged intersection, roadway flooding, a lack of sidewalks and lighting, and pavement widening,” the CID said in a recent public notice. CIDs are organizations that manage extra taxes levied by certain areas to improve local infrastructure.

The planned roundabout will connect Bailey Street, Woodstock Road, Fayetteville Road and Fleetwood Drive to a new traffic signal at the intersection of Moreland Avenue and Bailey Street. The CID will need to work with the Georgia Department of Transportation to install the new traffic light, and the roundabout’s plans are not finalized.

Named the Constitution Road Freight Corridor Improvement project, the roundabout is in response to the ongoing development in the area. CID leaders said they expect the corridor to become even busier with truck traffic over the next few years.

ajc.com

Credit: Sam Baskin

Credit: Sam Baskin

Development will include increasing the intersection’s size, buying adjacent property, making adjustments to property curb cuts, making drainage improvements and widening the road. The project’s financing includes DeKalb County special purpose local option sales tax funds, the CID’s funds and money from the Georgia Transportation Infrastructure Bank.

A public information open house was held last week, and a second one will be held in October to finalize the intersection’s design. Construction is expected to begin next summer.

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