SEC primary update: Rick Perry endorses Ted Cruz

All eyes are on Iowa with a week to go until the first ballots of 2016 are cast in the caucuses, but don't forget that we are a mere 36 days away from the SEC primary. Here is the latest news from around the March 1 states:

Texas:

The Texas primary is seen as a two-man race between hometown Sen. Ted Cruz and Donald Trump. While Cruz has worked the grassroots in the state for years, Trump’s camp is organized in all 36 of Texas' congressional districts and has formed a women’s coalition. (Fort Worth Star-Telegram)

***

Perhaps because of the above, former Texas governor and ex-GOP candidate Rick Perry has endorsed home-boy U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz. (Politico.com)

***

HUD Secretary and former San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro stumped for Hillary Clinton in Iowa, fueling vice-presidential chatter once again, though Castro says “That’s not something that I’ve ever believed was going to happen.” (Dallas Morning News) 

Alabama:

A poll taken for Alabama state Senate and House Republicans showed Donald Trump at 35 percent and Ted Cruz at 15 percent. The survey is somewhat moldy. It was taken in mid-December and only released now. (AL.com)

Tennessee:

A pair of state House Democrats introduced a bill to require the state to enforce the Constitution’s “natural born citizen” requirement in its November presidential ballot. Ted Cruz is the obvious target, but with Republicans controlling the Legislature, don’t expect it to go anywhere. (Associated Press)

***

Winter weather forced the Bernie Sanders campaign to postpone a Friday night rally at historically black Tennessee State University that was to feature a possible appearance by Atlanta rapper Killer Mike, but not Sanders himself. (The Tennessean)

Virginia

Gov. Terry McAuliffe, oft-rumored for Hillary Clinton’s cabinet, says “I’m not leaving early for anything,” and discusses his long relationship with Donald Trump. (Virginian Pilot) 

***

Former Republican Lt. Gov. Bill Bolling, without naming names, has a warning for the GOP in an op-ed: “If the party nominates a candidate who is viewed as being too extreme, divisive and out of touch with the American people, it will inevitably lose the election and drive another nail into what may quickly become the Republican Party’s coffin.” (Richmond Times-Dispatch) 

About the Author

Jim Galloway
Jim Galloway
Jim Galloway is a three-decade veteran of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution who writes the Political Insider blog and column.
X