APS wants in on the Emory annexation into Atlanta

While the city of Atlanta proper would wrap in the properties, the DeKalb County school system would retain jurisdiction over the limited number of students involved.

We’re presuming this is intended to avoid stirring up opposition, legal and otherwise, from DeKalb County. However, the Atlanta Public School system apparently doesn’t want to be left behind. And while the city school system has been silent on the issue,  that’s not likely to last.

Now, state Rep. Beth Beskin, R-Atlanta, has forwarded us an Aug. 24 missive from Carstarphen in which the APS superintendent indicates she expects the City Council to allow the school system to expand with the city. Writes Carstarphen:

***

***

Atlanta City Councilwoman Mary Norwood leads in the latest WSB-TV poll of the race for Atlanta mayor. And, just like her second-place finish in the 2009 race, Democrats seem likely to cast her as a closet Republican.

And while Norwood is determined that same label won't sink her in 2017 -- witness her recent visit to the Democratic National Committee meeting in Atlanta last February -- her adversaries are already trying to draw a firmer line between her and the GOP.

The photo above of Norwood flanked by a pair of Republicans - Fulton Commissioner Liz Hausmann and U.S. Rep. Karen Handel -- at the unveiling of the Martin Luther King Jr. statue at the state Capitol is already making the rounds. We wouldn't be shocked to see it in a campaign ad soon.

***

***

***

***

***

***

***

“While we may receive positive lip service, we know the establishment of both parties will fight this at every turn," Williams said. "Eliminating Georgia’s income tax for everyone is a top priority for my campaign. A sensible place to start is with military pay."

The proposal is not likely to get very far during next year's legislative session. House and Senate leaders couldn't broker an agreement on tax cuts last year, and Gov. Nathan Deal urged candidates running to succeed him to resist the "temptation" of broader changes to the tax system that could jeopardize the state's revenue base.

Williams campaign manager Seth Weathers said the tax cuts would cost between $200-$300 million and that "simply freezing the budget" would help pay for the cost.

But it's not as simple as that. Our AJC colleague James Salzer reports that the state takes in an extra $700 million to $900 million in tax collections every year, but much of that increase is taken up by growing enrollment in K-12 schools and universities, the rising cost of Medicaid and increased costs to the state's pension system.

As a result, Deal's office recently warned state agencies, there's little room left for discretionary spending in the state's budget.

Support real journalism. Support local journalism. Subscribe to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution today. See offers.

Your subscription to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution funds in-depth reporting and investigations that keep you informed. Thank you for supporting real journalism.

About the Author

Greg Bluestein
Greg Bluestein
Greg Bluestein is a political reporter who covers the governor's office and state politics for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
X