Vin Scully’s call on Hank Aaron’s 715th home run

His welcoming committee at home plate included his teammates and his mother Estella. Aaron endured racist hate mail on the way to 715. During the 1973 offseason, the FBI probed death threats against him, and he was given personal protection.
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His welcoming committee at home plate included his teammates and his mother Estella. Aaron endured racist hate mail on the way to 715. During the 1973 offseason, the FBI probed death threats against him, and he was given personal protection.

Credit: AP

Credit: AP

Here is Vin Scully’s call of Hank Aaron’s 715th home which came April 8, 1974 in the fourth inning off the Dodgers’ Al Downing at what was then known as Atlanta Stadium. It moved him past Babe Ruth on baseball’s all-time home run list.

“One ball and no strikes. Aaron waiting. The outfield deep and straight away. Fastball. It’s a high drive into deep left centerfield. Buckner goes back to the fence. It is gone.”

(No words, just the roaring crowd as Aaron circles the bases, for 26 seconds.)

“What a marvelous moment for baseball. What a marvelous moment for Atlanta and the state of Georgia. What a marvelous moment for the country and the world. A Black man is getting a standing ovation in the Deep South for breaking a record on an all-time baseball idol. And it is a great moment for all of us and for particularly for Henry Aaron, who has met at home plate, not only be every member of the Braves but by his father and mother. He threw his arms around his father and as he left the home plate area, his mother came running across the grass, threw her arms around his neck, kissed me for all she was worth.”

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