Albany to install two ‘Overdose Aid Kit’ boxes

Each OAK box will be stocked with Narcan, gloves, masks and fentanyl test kits
Change Center Director Alesha Burgman displays contents of the first of two Opioid Aid Kits to be located in Albany. The boxes can be accessed at all times and provide Narcan and other supplies needed to aid an individual experiencing an opioid overdose. (Photo Courtesy of Alan Mauldin)

Credit: Alan Mauldin

Credit: Alan Mauldin

Change Center Director Alesha Burgman displays contents of the first of two Opioid Aid Kits to be located in Albany. The boxes can be accessed at all times and provide Narcan and other supplies needed to aid an individual experiencing an opioid overdose. (Photo Courtesy of Alan Mauldin)

Just as fire alarms can be lifesavers in a fire, two metal boxes are coming to Albany with the same aim of saving lives - but in this case, to revive individuals who have overdosed on opioids.

One of the Overdose Aid Kit (OAK) boxes has already been placed at the Change Center in downtown Albany. It’s stocked with Narcan, gloves, masks and fentanyl test kits. Located outside the 500 Pine Ave. drug-recovery assistance center, the contents can be utilized 24 hours a day and also will include information on how to access resources for addiction recovery.

Plans are to locate the other OAK box in the vicinity of North Slappey Boulevard and Palmyra Road.

Narcan, the brand name of a nasal version of naloxone, can reverse an opioid overdose and restore normal breathing to individuals who have passed out and whose breathing has slowed.

Surviving an overdose can be a first step in getting on the road to recovery, Change Center Director Alesha Burgman said.

Each of the OAK boxes and its contents were donated to the Change Center’s parent organization, Aspire Behavioral Health and Developmental Disability Services, and the city of Albany. The donations were made by the Clinton Foundation and Mobilize Recovery Across Georgia, both of which participated in the organization’s September in the Streets drug recovery celebration.

“It’s really about saving lives,” Burgman said. “What we know is, where there is breath, there is hope (so) they can live to make better choices moving forward.”

The Change Center will check the OAK boxes each day and restock supplies as needed. While the Dougherty County Health Department distributes Narcan during the week, the boxes will make the lifesaving Narcan available 24/7.


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Credit: Albany Herald

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Credit: Albany Herald

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