Readers Write: Ga. needs a senator regularly willing to face the public

The U.S. Capitol Building. (Dreamstime/TNS)

Credit: TNS

Credit: TNS

Ga. needs a senator regularly willing to face the public

Regarding, “Why Georgia’s twin Senate races are up for grabs” (AJC.com, Sept. 23), reporter Greg Bluestein’s analysis is good but misses a point why Sen. David Purdue is struggling for reelection. With zero outreach to his constituents, he has embraced a “Don’t call me, we’ll call you” philosophy for the past five years, regarding town halls or public events. He rarely is seen in Georgia except at the heels of Donald Trump. Politics aside, doesn’t Georgia deserve someone who can both listen and talk?

GREG MARTIN, SMYRNA

Election shenanigans made up this voter’s mind

We all agree this is the most important election we as a country have ever seen. It also is full of more attacks from each candidate than our country has ever seen. What do these candidates stand for? What are their plans when they become president? Do the promises they make mean anything? I thought it could not get any uglier until I read Mayor Michael Bloomberg raised money to pay the fines and fees for 32,000 Florida felons. He will then make sure they are registered and able to vote in the upcoming election. Guess for whom they will cast their vote? Do the media side with one candidate over the other? What happened to the basic who, what, when, where and why? The voters need all the facts to make an educated decision. I had not decided for whom I will vote. I am no longer undecided. This is not an election to see who can sling the most mud at each other.

ANN BOST, MARIETTA

Senate’s about-face will only deepen partisan divide

President Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell have executed a 180-degree turn to fill a U.S. Supreme Court seat. In 2016, McConnell, with candidate Trump’s support, took what he considered a principled position of blocking then-President Obama’s nominee to the Supreme Court within eight months of a presidential election, saying the next president should be able to do that. Now, with fewer than eight weeks to go before the election, the president and McConnell are hell-bent to complete the process of identifying, vetting and holding hearings for a nominee. They must be very concerned President Trump won’t be reelected and Republicans will lose control of the Senate; otherwise, there would be no reason to rush the process. Senators who sided with McConnell in 2016 have only one ethical choice now: Postpone the process until the next president and Senate are in place. Switching positions now will only deepen the partisan divide.

MARK P. HUNTER, ATLANTA

Without vigilance, far right fascism can happen here

In the story, “Bitter fight is building in Georgia over bench” (News, Sept. 21) regarding the Supreme Court vacancy, it was mentioned that Sen. Loeffler spoke at a rally where she was flanked by members of a far right so-called militia. Hearing that one of our highest elected officials uses her position to give legitimacy to heavily armed right-wing thugs is chilling. A nationwide militia network exists that is anti-government, anti-Semitic, and white supremacist. These are many of the same people who revere and honor the memory of armed insurrection against the United States by the Confederacy, which resulted in the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Americans. As an American Jew, I am alarmed when my elected representative cozies up to a fascist group. It can happen here. Only we can prevent it.

REUBEN HALLER, ATLANTA

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