Readers write

Credit: pskinner@ajc.com

Credit: pskinner@ajc.com

President’s vow of retaliation should not be trusted

The headline in the AJC, “Biden to attackers: we will ‘make you pay,’” (News, Aug. 27), was viewed with disbelief and outright disgust.

Given the current debacle, how can anyone accept a vow of retaliation from our government leadership with any degree of credibility? Marines, young and old, of any rank, are asking the question, “Am I doing the right thing?” Parents and families of the casualties are begging for justification for their sacrifice. There is none.

The apparent purpose of the entire military operation is to facilitate an unconditional surrender. How about a word of contrition? How about accountability? How about some outrage from either of our senators? As my first and primary source for news, I am dismayed that someone in an elevated position in your newspaper thinks that professional journalism requires that hogwash be a fine substitute for a headline.

DICK EASLEY, SUWANEE

Biden shows leadership in pulling out of Afghanistan

If we ever needed evidence of Biden’s wisdom in drawing America out of Afghanistan, the ISIS-K attack that killed Americans and Afghans provides it.

Can anyone believe America should remain there?

No one has succeeded in exercising real control over Afghanistan, not the Russians, not the U.S., and not the official Afghan government. And now, two intransigent military groups are locking horns to see which of them might pull it off.

The situation is mind-boggling and always has been.

Our good-heartedness and strategic interests have led a succession of presidents to help Afghanistan, but it has been largely to no avail. Biden has inherited a house in which wasps and hornets have established nests so dense that one wonders if they can ever be cleaned out.

I admire Biden’s forthright talk and decisiveness. Sure, millions will analyze and reanalyze his decisions, but he makes it clear that he owns them. There’s no shrinking away from difficulty, no harebrained tactics. This is leadership.

RICKS CARSON, ATLANTA