Readers write

Credit: pskinner@ajc.com

Credit: pskinner@ajc.com

Gwinnett’s school discipline stats reveal underlying problems

The news story, “Gwinnett to seek discipline reform” (News, Aug. 29), discussed the Gwinnett County schools having more students sent to alternative schools (for discipline) than the next five largest districts combined during 2018 and 2019.

Gwinnett School Board members are troubled by that statistic marking their district. Probably, Gwinnett County has numerous combined factors of residential attraction that motivate the families of lesser-disciplined children to decide to live there. Costs of housing, commuting distance to jobs and associations with other people come to mind.

Do not call statistics the problem. Inadequate discipline is the cause; statistics only measure effects!

Discipline not maintained during early youth only pushes the problem to the next level of involvement with other people -- the school system.

Ignore the stigma; treat the problem. Discipline not maintained in the school system pushes the problem toward the criminal justice system.

Society is dysfunctional (road rage, murders, etc.) if not properly (and adequately) disciplined.

TOM STREETS, ATLANTA

Justice needed for neglect of Atlanta’s minority communities

Another child was killed August 27. According to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, that may be the 21st child killing this year in metro Atlanta.

The Fulton County DA is busy investigating Trump; where do they get the time or money? It will be ongoing for a long time, and it has not been determined if it is legal or not.

The minority community should be up in arms over this neglect. Poor minorities often live in government housing complexes run by gangs that are so bad the police do not want to go there. The gangs’ philosophy is, if we want it, give it to us; if you do not, we will take it and leave you with a remembrance. The justice system is overwhelmed; schools and housing are substandard.

I know how things are in public housing. I did scout programs and taught after school there. The young people there were all intelligent -- they only needed positive guidance.

BILL SWILLEY, CHAMBLEE