Caption

NASA’s Juno spacecraft reveals a storm brewing over Jupiter

On Feb. 7, NASA’s Juno spacecraft captured an image of a swirling storm on Jupiter during its 11th flyby.

» RELATED: NASA mission unlocks more secrets about Jupiter

NASA shared a color-enhanced version of the “close-up view of a storm with bright cloud tops in the northern hemisphere of Jupiter” on Friday.

The photo was processed and adjusted by citizen scientists Matt Brealey and Gustavo B C using data from the JunoCam imager.

Recommended for you

Recommended for you

Recommended for you

Most read

  1. 1 Stacey Abrams tells Hollywood: don’t boycott Georgia
  2. 2 High school football player dies after breaking neck in game
  3. 3 Georgia 2018 election for governor certified between Kemp and Abrams

The Juno mission, which launched in August 2011 and arrived at Jupiter in July 2016, has already revealed much about the gas planet, its atmosphere and interior structure through high-precision radio science and infrared technologies. Scientists believe further research will help them better understand how the planet — and the solar system at large — formed and evolved.

» RELATED: NASA captures stunning close-up photos of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot


Recent findings published in the journal Nature showed the massive cyclones surrounding Jupiter’s north and south poles are “unlike anything else encountered in our solar system,” NASA wrote in a March 7 news release.

Composite infrared image from Juno of clusters of massive cyclones surrounding Jupiter’s north pole. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/ASI/INAF/JIRAM.)

In fact, according to the agency, data from the Juno mission to Jupiter indicate that the atmospheric winds of the planet run deeper into its atmosphere and last even longer than similar atmospheric processes found here on Earth. 

“Juno is only about one third the way through its primary mission, and already we are seeing the beginnings of a new Jupiter,” principal Juno investigator Scott Bolton said.

Read more about the Juno mission at nasa.gov.

More from AJC