READERS WRITE

Georgia not immune to gov’t. overreach

Once again, government regulations are blocking business, “Georgia auto dealers aim to block Tesla sales,” (News, Nov. 15). It is time to rise up and stop this regulation madness. State government interference is killing small business and true conservatives should make their voices heard. This is a test. What do you really want — regulations or freedom. Get the government out of the way and let the small businessman succeed. State government, “get out of our way!”

FAYE ANDRESEN, ATLANTA

Having won, what’s next for GOP?

So the Republicans have “won” and will be firmly in control of both houses of the new Congress. What will happen now? Thus far during the Obama presidency, the Republicans have been little more than a party of “no” – no to health care access for everyone, no to immigration reform, no to marriage equality. The list can go on and on. But for the most part, they have only attempted to tear down and criticize, and have failed to propose any serious or significant alternatives to what they are opposing. Will that change in 2015? Or will they be like that dog who has chased the car and finally caught it? Time will tell if they are actually able to pass legislation that might do something positive to help make our country a better place for all tn the coming two years.

FRANK LOULAN, JONESBORO

Deny killers infamy they seek

I was very bothered when I saw the story “An American Teenager” (News, Nov. 16). The media has a hand in these mass shootings and the lives of innocent people across the country. The criminal in this article has gotten exactly what he wanted as evidenced by his suicide note stating, “Maybe a part of this also is the fact that a life in infamy is better than being just another nobody”. This shooter sought the infamy of those involved in Columbine whose names and stories would only have been known from the never-ending media coverage devoted to these killers and their personal lives. The media should band together and never divulge the name, age, gender, personal history or photo of these criminals, which will eliminate the motive of future outcasts and loners looking for the attention they so desperately need.

MARK SCHWAB, ATLANTA

Climate change remedies needed now

I was encouraged after reading “Climate Deal: A Start or a Charade?” (News, Nov. 11). Isn’t it sad that some in Congress refuse to support positive news that will result in a healthier environment for future generations? The news that China and the U.S. have plans to take definitive steps to reduce the effects of greenhouse gas emissions is good news! If the two countries with the highest level of pollution from burning of fossil fuels are agreeing to curb carbon emissions, other nations are sure to follow. Our President is doing what he can. It will be up to Congress to do their part by passing legislation that places a fee on carbon, and distributes that revenue to all Americans. This will move the U.S. toward clean energy and create jobs. If steps to abate this crisis are not taken now, then when? A ship can’t turn on a dime, but maybe the icebergs will be melted by then.

NIKKI VAN DER GRINTEN, CHAMBLEE

Liberal cartoonist ignores data

Mike Luckovich’s cartoon “Money Talks” (Opinion, Nov. 9) ignores the facts: 1) total political spending in this midterm cycle was essentially flat, and 2) Republicans outspent Democrats by only 6 percent, which is not surprising given that Republicans were challenging so many incumbents. These facts can be found easily, but were ignored by Luckovich, revealing his liberal bias.

CHARLES OGBURN, ATLANTA