Readers write: July 9

Jobs are solution to education funding

I read with interest the editorials by Gov. Nathan Deal and gubernatorial candidate Jason Carter on public education in Georgia (“School choice, innovation vital,” “Schools need more support,” Opinion, July 6). I was stunned at Carter’s complete lack of understanding of our current situation. He seems to be a typical Democrat — blame, blame, blame — but shows no understanding and offers no solutions.

Will someone please explain to Carter that we have been in the worst depression since the 1930s? Will you inform him this recession has been sustained by decisions made by Democrats in Washington, particularly the president? The real problem is a shrinking tax base caused by there being no real, well-paying, full-time jobs. The solution to the problems in education funding is jobs. There are no money trees, only taxes. Taxes are paid by people with jobs who can afford housing. Just like President Barack Obama, Carter appears to have flunked Economics 101. We don’t need someone that out of touch with the economics of our situation in our statehouse.

SHEPARD S. AVERITT IV, CUMMING

Citizenship pledge shows pride and joy

I love the picture of new U.S. citizens reciting the Pledge of Allegiance after completing the full requirements for citizenship (“More than 1,000 become citizens at Turner Field ceremony,” Metro, July 3). That should be in the running for picture of the year recognition. That look of pride, joy and hope in becoming a U.S. citizen is what we should all feel on Independence Day. What a great example they set for us.

PAUL DEPPERSCHMIDT, LAWRENCEVILLE

Race profiteers don’t allow dialogue

Two guest columnists talked about the discussion on race and how difficult these discussions are (“Race: An unspeakable subject?” Opinion, July 3). I remember when President Bill Clinton helped to sponsor open discussions on race early in his first administration. He had good motives, but these discussions quickly died when white people realized no real, two-way dialogue was welcome, and their role in the talks was to fall down on their knees and apologize for the past “sins” of white people. Nothing has changed, nor will it change as long as race-profiteers are allowed to control the dialogue. Most whites, myself included, know that any white person who dares make any criticism of Black America will be attacked and savaged.

ERNEST WADE, LOGANVILLE