Watch the International Space Station fly across the solar eclipse

A NASA photographer managed to capture the moment that the International Space Station moved across the solar eclipse Monday in a series of rare high-speed photos.

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Space agency photo editor Joel Kowsky used a high-speed camera from a vantage point in Banner, Wyoming to shoot the eclipse at the exact moment the ISS flew in front of it 250 miles above the Earth.

With a crescent-shaped sun as the backdrop, Kowsky managed to shoot the movements of the space station, which appear as a small “H” traveling at 17,500 mph across the face of the eclipsed sun.

2017 Total Solar Eclipse

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Also Monday, astronauts aboard the space station were the only people who got to see what the eclipse looked like from space and they managed to snap a photo of it, too.

>> Related: Watch for cool shadow snakes just before and after eclipse

“While millions experienced #Eclipse2017, only six people saw the umbra, or moon's shadow, over the United States from space today,” the crew said in a post on Instagram that accompanied the photo.

There’s a crew of six aboard the ISS right now.

>> Related: Solar Eclipse 2017: NASA live stream, live updates

>> Related: Photos: Lunar eclipse

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